Appellate

  • May 21, 2024

    NC Panel Cans Atty's 'Grossly Excessive' Fees In Wage Suit

    A North Carolina appeals court rejected a real estate agent's bid to be awarded nearly $500,000 in attorney fees after winning an unpaid wages lawsuit, reasoning Tuesday that state wage law doesn't require that fees be granted to a prevailing party.

  • May 21, 2024

    Senate Backs Federal Prosecutor For Ariz. District Judgeship

    The Senate voted 66-26 on Tuesday to confirm Assistant U.S. Attorney Krissa M. Lanham to the District of Arizona.

  • May 21, 2024

    DOJ, VW Ask 9th Circ. To Void Jones Day Docs Release Order

    The U.S. Department of Justice and Volkswagen have told the Ninth Circuit that forcing them to release confidential Volkswagen documents that were part of a Jones Day investigation into the automaker's 2015 emissions-cheating scandal would have far-reaching, chilling implications for federal criminal prosecutions.

  • May 21, 2024

    Strategic Hiring Was The New Normal For BigLaw In 2023

    The 400 largest law firms by headcount in the U.S. grew more slowly in 2023 than in the previous two years, while Kirkland & Ellis LLP surpassed the 3,000-attorney threshold, according to the latest Law360 ranking.

  • May 21, 2024

    The Law360 400: Tracking The Largest US Law Firms

    The legal market expanded more tentatively in 2023 than in previous years amid a slowdown in demand for legal services, especially in transactions, an area that has been sluggish but is expected to quicken in the latter half of the coming year.

  • May 21, 2024

    Full Fed. Circ. Throws Out 'Rigid' Tests For Design Patents

    The full Federal Circuit on Tuesday overruled long-standing tests for proving that design patents are invalid as obvious, finding that the rules are "improperly rigid" and holding that the obviousness test for utility patents should be used instead.

  • May 21, 2024

    3rd Circ. Revives American Airline Pilots' Military Leave Suit

    The Third Circuit reopened a class action Tuesday accusing American Airlines of unlawfully denying pilots pay for short military assignments while compensating employees for jury duty and bereavement leave, ruling a trial is needed to determine whether time off for military service is fungible with paid absences.

  • May 20, 2024

    Law On Indian Country Jurisdiction Still Unsettled, Tulsa Says

    Officials of Tulsa, Oklahoma, have asked a federal district court to deny an intervention bid by the United States in a tribal challenge over criminal jurisdiction, saying that as an alternative, the lawsuit should be paused pending the outcome of a state case in which the governor's brother is fighting a speeding ticket.

  • May 20, 2024

    Justices Turn Away Hospital Construction Feud

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a case that centers on a $180 million project to expand a Mississippi children's hospital, once again declining to resolve whether parties that agree to certain arbitral rules have also agreed to delegate jurisdictional questions to the arbitrator.

  • May 20, 2024

    NJ Court Says Qualification Mismatch Dooms Med Mal Suit

    A New Jersey appeals court said Monday if a doctor accused of malpractice has two specialties and the treatment involves both specialties the plaintiff must produce an expert report from a physician who is also certified in those specialties, and affirmed the dismissal of a wrongful death suit.

  • May 20, 2024

    Idaho, Micron Defend 'Bad Faith' Patent Law At Fed. Circ.

    The state of Idaho and Micron Technology Inc. have told the Federal Circuit that Idaho's law barring "bad faith" allegations of patent infringement is constitutional, defending a lower court's ruling that Longhorn IP must pay an $8 million bond under the law.

  • May 20, 2024

    Texas Judge Rescinds Denial Of SpaceX's Rethink Bid

    A Texas federal judge on Monday walked back his decision last week not to reconsider an order transferring SpaceX's National Labor Relations Board constitutionality dispute to a California court, saying he is "awaiting input from the Fifth Circuit."

  • May 20, 2024

    Transparency Act Violates Constitution, Groups Tell 11th Circ.

    The Corporate Transparency Act's reporting requirements violate the Fifth Amendment's protection against self-incrimination and other constitutional provisions, libertarian think tank Cato Institute and others said Monday in urging the Eleventh Circuit to uphold an Alabama district court's ruling against the law.

  • May 20, 2024

    NC License Law Didn't Violate 1st Amendment, 4th Circ. Finds

    The Fourth Circuit held on Monday that North Carolina's licensing requirements for surveyors don't violate the free speech rights of a drone pilot who sought to create maps for customers, with the court finding the state regulation is backed by sound public interests.

  • May 20, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Says Co. Wrongly DQ'd From USPS Screening Deal

    The Federal Circuit has revived a company's potential eligibility for U.S. Postal Service canine mail screening contracts, ruling the USPS reasonably found the company had mitigated conflicts of interest related to its prior work for the service.

  • May 20, 2024

    Ski Resorts Can't Dodge Safety Duties, Colo. Justices Rule

    Colorado ski resorts can't use waivers to free themselves from liability for failing to follow state ski safety laws, the state Supreme Court ruled Monday, concluding that allowing ski resorts to escape such liability would frustrate lawmakers' intent.

  • May 20, 2024

    HOA Pecks At Chickens-As-Pets Theory In NC Appeal

    A North Carolina couple's 60-plus chickens aren't household pets, a local homeowners association has told the state's top court in seeking to reinstate a $31,500 judgment in its favor that was upended last month by a three-judge panel in the lower appeals court.

  • May 20, 2024

    Lyft Has No Duty To Screen Passengers For Criminal History

    A California appeals court has thrown out a former Lyft Inc. driver's suit against the company alleging he was stabbed by a passenger because the company failed to perform background checks on passengers, saying the company has no such duty.

  • May 20, 2024

    4th Circ. Says 'Gargantuan' NC Beach Home Meets Zoning Regs

    A 15,000-square-foot oceanfront vacation home with 24 bedrooms, 25 bathrooms and a swimming pool in North Carolina's Currituck County complies with state and county zoning requirements, the Fourth Circuit ruled in a published opinion.

  • May 20, 2024

    Travelers Owed Tech Co. Defense In TM Row, 8th Circ. Says

    Travelers had a duty to defend a computer retailer in an underlying trademark infringement action filed by Cisco Systems, the Eighth Circuit affirmed Monday, saying it cannot conclude that coverage is barred by the policy's related-acts provision.

  • May 20, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Revive Challenge To $39B Student Debt Relief

    A pair of libertarian think tanks cannot revive their lawsuit challenging the Biden administration's plan to wipe out $39 billion in student loan debt, the Sixth Circuit ruled Friday, saying the groups haven't shown the government's plan puts them at a disadvantage to recruit indebted lawyers and other employees.

  • May 20, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Blesses Commerce's Tariffs On Spanish Olives

    The Federal Circuit on Monday upheld the U.S. Department of Commerce's countervailing tariffs on Spanish table olives, backing the department's determination that the businesses that processed raw olives into table olives benefited from the subsidies given to the farmers.

  • May 20, 2024

    10th Circ. Oral Args. Poised To Shape NM Pollution Coverage

    The Tenth Circuit said there were "good arguments on both sides" of an appeal at oral arguments Monday over whether absolute pollution exclusions doomed a New Mexico property owner's quest for defense coverage of underlying contamination litigation, in a case that could set the tone for insurance battles in the state.

  • May 20, 2024

    Split Fed. Circ. Affirms Del. Atty Fees Can't Include PTAB Work

    Dish Network and Sirius XM aren't entitled to attorney fees for getting a patent they were accused of infringing invalidated at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, even if the instigating infringement claims were deemed "objectively baseless," a split Federal Circuit panel affirmed Monday.

  • May 20, 2024

    5th Circ. Halts Texas County's Electioneering Rules

    The Fifth Circuit paused new electioneering rules in Palo Pinto County, Texas, on Sunday, the day before the start of early voting for a local primary runoff election, handing a victory to conservative groups that sought to strike down county rules limiting how they could electioneer outside polling locations.

Expert Analysis

  • Navigating Title VII Compliance And Litigation Post-Muldrow

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Muldrow v. St. Louis has broadened the scope of Title VII litigation, meaning employers must reassess their practices to ensure compliance across jurisdictions and conduct more detailed factual analyses to defend against claims effectively, say Robert Pepple and Christopher Stevens at Nixon Peabody.

  • How CFPB Credit Card Rules Slot Into Broader Considerations

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    Swirling legal challenges against the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's recent rulemaking concerning credit card late fees raise questions about how regulated entities should respond to the bureau's rules — and how quickly they should act, say Caitlin Mandel and Elizabeth Ireland at Winston & Strawn.

  • Perspectives

    Public Interest Attorneys Are Key To Preserving Voting Rights

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    Fourteen states passed laws restricting or limiting voting access last year, highlighting the need to support public interest lawyers who serve as bulwarks against such antidemocratic actions — especially in an election year, says Verna Williams at Equal Justice Works.

  • Insurer Quota-Sharing Lessons From $112M Bad Faith Verdict

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    In Indiana GRQ v. American Guarantee and Liability Insurance, an Indiana federal jury recently issued a landmark $112 million bad faith verdict, illustrating why insurers must understand the interplay between bad faith law and quota-sharing before entering into these relatively new arrangements, say Jason Reichlyn and Christopher Sakauye at Dykema. 

  • Lessons On Challenging Class Plaintiffs' Expert Testimony

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    In class actions seeking damages, plaintiffs are increasingly using expert opinions to establish predominance, but several recent rulings from California federal courts shed light on how defendants can respond, say Jennifer Romano and Raija Horstman at Crowell & Moring.

  • Novel Applications May Fizzle After Fed Master Account Wins

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    Two recent federal court rulings that upheld decisions denying master account applications from two fintech-focused banks are noteworthy for depository institutions with novel charters that wish to have direct access to the Federal Reserve's payment channels and settle transactions in central bank money, say attorneys at Davis Polk.

  • Exploring An Alternative Model Of Litigation Finance

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    A new model of litigation finance, most aptly described as insurance-backed litigation funding, differs from traditional funding in two key ways, and the process of securing it involves three primary steps, say Bob Koneck, Christopher Le Neve Foster and Richard Butters at Atlantic Global Risk LLC.

  • Cell Therapy Cos. Must Beware Limits Of Patent Safe Harbors

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    Though developers of gene and cell therapy products commonly assume that a legal safe harbor protects them from patent infringement suits, recent case law shows that not all preapproval uses of patented technology are necessarily protected, say Natasha Daughtrey and Joshua Weinger at Goodwin.

  • Why Employers Shouldn't Overreact To Protest Activities

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    Recent decisions from the First Circuit in Kinzer v. Whole Foods and the National Labor Relations Board in Home Depot hold eye-opening takeaways about which employee conduct is protected as "protest activity" and make a case for fighting knee-jerk reactions that could result in costly legal proceedings, says Frank Shuster at Constangy.

  • Devil's In The Details On FDCPA, Article III Standing

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    The Third Circuit’s recent decision in Barclift v. Keystone Credit Services concerning the alleged harm needed to support a class action under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act is in line with other circuits' interpretations of Article III of the Constitution, notwithstanding disagreement over the minutiae of a proper Article III analysis, says Nick Agnello at Burr & Forman.

  • 11th Circ. Ruling May Foreshadow Ch. 15 Clashes

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent decision in In re: Talal Qais Abdulmunem Al Zawawi has introduced a split from the Second Circuit regarding whether debtors in foreign proceedings must have a domicile, calling attention to the understudied nature of Chapter 15 of the Bankruptcy Code, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • What The Justices' Copyright Damages Ruling Didn't Address

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    While the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Warner Chappell v. Nealy clarified when a copyright owner may recover damages in jurisdictions that apply the so-called discovery rule, it did not settle the overriding question of whether the Copyright Act even permits applying the rule, say Ivy Estoesta and William Milliken at Sterne Kessler.

  • Series

    Teaching Yoga Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Being a yoga instructor has helped me develop my confidence and authenticity, as well as stress management and people skills — all of which have crossed over into my career as an attorney, says Laura Gongaware at Clyde & Co.

  • TTAB Ruling Raises Foreign-Language Mark Questions

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    The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board's recent decision to cancel the Veuve Olivier registration due to its similarity to Veuve Clicquot brings new focus to the treatment of foreign terms and the doctrine of foreign equivalents, say attorneys at Finnegan.

  • A Vision For Economic Clerkships In The Legal System

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    As courts handle increasingly complex damages analyses involving vast amounts of data, an economic clerkship program — integrating early-career economists into the judicial system — could improve legal outcomes and provide essential training to clerks, say Mona Birjandi at Data for Decisions and Matt Farber at Secretariat.

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