Corporate Crime & Compliance UK

  • May 13, 2024

    Law Firm Beats Paralegal's COVID Whistleblower Claim

    An employment tribunal has dismissed a former paralegal's claim alleging she was unfairly dismissed for raising complaints about her mentor's behavior and COVID-19 practices, finding the disclosures didn't play a part in the firm's decision to fire her.

  • May 13, 2024

    CMA Can Appeal Nixed £100M Fine In NHS Drug Pricing Case

    The Competition and Markets Authority was granted permission on Monday to challenge a tribunal's ruling that overturned more than £100 million ($126 million) in fines against drug companies for fixing agreements that allegedly increased the price of hydrocortisone tablets.

  • May 13, 2024

    Royal Mail Beats Rival's Costs Claim, But £600M Trial Still Set

    Royal Mail has beaten a rival's claim for £2.8 million ($3.5 million) in legal costs that arose when it helped the communications watchdog uphold a £50 million fine against the postal delivery service.

  • May 13, 2024

    Gov't Tells Finance, Law Watchdogs To Improve AML Reports

    HM Treasury and Britain's anti-money laundering watchdog have told professional bodies in sectors including law and accounting to sharpen the focus in their annual reports on failures in compliance and supervisory actions.

  • May 13, 2024

    BetCity Says €850M Buyout Was Good Value Despite Inquiries

    The former owners of online sports betting operator BetCity admit that they breached some of the terms from Entain's €850 million ($920 million) buyout, but have argued that the gambling giant knew of the investigations and failed to seek a better deal.

  • May 10, 2024

    Stagecoach's £25M Ticket Class Action Settlement Approved

    The U.K.'s Competition Appeal Tribunal has agreed to passenger rail operator Stagecoach's £25 million ($31 million) settlement with passengers who say they were overcharged for train tickets.

  • May 10, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen Playtech file an intellectual property claim against online casino company OnAir Entertainment amid allegations of corporate spying, a broadcast equipment company sue its former owner amid allegations he conspired to inflate a customer’s finances, and aerospace company Vertical Aerospace hit a manufacturer with a claim following a test flight crash. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 10, 2024

    UK Class Actions Face Tougher Test On Distributing Damages

    A decision by the antitrust tribunal to certify a £790 million ($990 million) mass claim against major European power cable suppliers came with the caveat that it intends to take a tougher approach toward claimant lawyers' plans for getting awards into the pockets of consumers.

  • May 10, 2024

    Ex-Plastics Co. Manager Spared Prison For Insider Dealing

    A London judge gave a former manager at a plastics company an 18-month suspended prison sentence on Friday for insider dealing in connection with the £261 million ($327 million) purchase of a rival company.

  • May 10, 2024

    Director Imprisoned For Deceiving FCA In £1.2M Fraud Probe

    A business director was sentenced to 18 months in prison on Friday for providing a forged document to investigators in a fruitless attempt to prop up the defense of self-styled investment brokers now convicted of a £1.2 million ($1.5 million) boiler room fraud.

  • May 10, 2024

    Ex-Madagascan Official, Partner Get 5½ Years For Bribery Plot

    A former leading aide to the president of Madagascar and her French associate were sentenced on Friday to a total of more than five-and-a-half years in prison for soliciting bribes to secure mining rights in the southeast African country for a U.K. gem company.

  • May 10, 2024

    Osborne Clarke Lawyer To Face Tribunal Over Zahawi SLAPP

    An Osborne Clarke LLP partner who represented Nadhim Zahawi could face a disciplinary tribunal over allegations that he used intimidatory warnings in an attempt to silence a critic who was probing the former Conservative chancellor's tax affairs.

  • May 10, 2024

    FCA Warns Firms Of Market Abuse Surveillance Failings

    The Financial Conduct Authority has warned in its latest market watch newsletter that some companies have inadequate or faulty systems to detect market abuse, with insufficient governance arrangements.

  • May 10, 2024

    MPs Mull Using Frozen Russian Assets For Ukraine Recovery

    Politicians are to probe leading experts, including the head of financial crime and compliance at Lloyd's of London, on whether the U.K. should follow the European Union and use profits from Russia's frozen assets to help Ukraine, as they examine the sanctions regime.

  • May 09, 2024

    Ex-Goldman Banker Fights To Overturn Contempt Ruling

    A former Goldman Sachs banker urged a London appellate court panel Thursday to overturn a ruling that he had breached court orders to hand over information about the financial assets of the wife of an imprisoned Turkish politician. 

  • May 09, 2024

    Royal Bank Of Canada Beats Analyst's Bullying Claim

    The Royal Bank of Canada convinced an employment tribunal to toss discrimination claims from a former employee because he filed his action too late.

  • May 09, 2024

    Google Fights To Shut Down Advertising Antitrust Case

    Tech giant Google asked a London tribunal on Thursday to strike out a proposed class action brought on behalf of website publishers who run advertisements over alleged anti-competitive practices, arguing the claim is not properly pleaded and does not sufficiently set out damages.

  • May 09, 2024

    Ex-Goldman Banker Fights US Extradition On Bribery Charges

    A former Goldman Sachs banker wanted in the U.S. for allegedly bribing Ghanaian officials fought the decision by the U.K. to extradite him on Thursday, arguing that the alleged offense took place in London when he was an employee of the investment bank. 

  • May 09, 2024

    Watchdog Preps Rules For Banks To Repay High-Value Fraud

    The payments watchdog has set out plans to extend its fraud reimbursement scheme to high-value bank transfers through the CHAPS system, reducing the risk that fraudsters will move there to avoid detection.

  • May 08, 2024

    SFO Says Fuel Trader Pocketed Secret Commissions

    A former biodiesel trader took secret commission payments buying and selling fuel and laundered some of the profits back to his Dutch customer, a prosecutor told jurors in London on Wednesday.

  • May 08, 2024

    FCA Mulls 'Enforcement Watch' As Naming Alternative

    The Financial Conduct Authority's top executives on Wednesday vigorously defended its plans to name firms under investigation, but saw value in a potential alternative move to publish an "enforcement watch" newsletter giving an overview.

  • May 15, 2024

    RPC Hires New Competition Chief From MoFo

    Reynolds Porter Chamberlain LLP has hired a new partner to lead its London competition practice who brings more than a decade of experience advising on global antitrust issues at Morrison Foerster LLP.

  • May 08, 2024

    StanChart Bids To Toss Investors' Sanctions Claim On Appeal

    Standard Chartered PLC urged an appeals court Wednesday to toss accusations from investors that it had downplayed the extent to which it had breached U.S. sanctions against Iran by hundreds of billions of dollars, saying they have insufficient evidence to support them.

  • May 08, 2024

    Top KC Denies Ignoring Post Office Prosecution Issues

    A barrister who advised the Post Office on its past prosecutions has denied "turning a blind eye" by not investigating why an expert witness whose evidence was used to convict innocent people misled the courts, as he appeared before an inquiry on Wednesday.

  • May 08, 2024

    Three Men Plead Not Guilty In £4M Water Investment Fraud

    Three men pleaded not guilty on Wednesday at a London court to defrauding investors out of £3.9 million ($4.9 million) through an unregulated investment scheme promising to build water production plants in Australia, New Zealand and Africa.

Expert Analysis

  • The Good, The Bad And The New Of The UK Sanctions Regime

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    Almost six years after the Sanctions and Money Laundering Act was introduced, the U.K. government has published a strategy paper that outlines its focus points and unveils potential changes to the regime, such as a new humanitarian exception for financial sanctions, highlighting the rapid transformation of the U.K. sanctions landscape, says Josef Rybacki at WilmerHale.

  • Businesses Using AI Face Novel Privacy, Cybersecurity Risks

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    Rapid advancements in artificial intelligence are resulting in complex privacy and cybersecurity challenges for businesses, and with the forthcoming EU AI Act and enhancement of existing laws to ensure a high common level of security, key stakeholders should be empowered to manage associated risks, say lawyers at Goodwin.

  • A Look At Environment Agency's New Economic Crime Unit

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    Sophie Wood at Kingsley Napley explains how the Environment Agency’s newly established Economic Crime Unit will pursue criminal money flows from environmental offenses, and discusses the unit’s civil powers, including the ability to administer account freezing and forfeiture orders, says Sophie Wood at Kingsley Napley.

  • Prompt Engineering Skills Are Changing The Legal Profession

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    With a focus on higher-value work as repetitive tasks are delegated to artificial intelligence, legal roles are set to become more inspiring, and lawyers need not fear the rising demand for prompt engineers that is altering the technology-enabled legal environment, say Eric Crawley, Shah Karim and Paul O’Hagan at Epiq Legal.

  • Opinion

    UK Whistleblowers Flock To The US For Good Reason

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    The U.K. Serious Fraud Office director recently brought renewed attention to the differences between the U.K. and U.S. whistleblower regimes — differences that may make reporting to U.S. agencies a better and safer option for U.K. whistleblowers, and show why U.K. whistleblower laws need to be improved, say Benjamin Calitri and Kate Reeves at Kohn Kohn.

  • 4 Ways To Prepare For EU's Digital Finance Security Law

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    Companies that will fall under the scope of the Digital Operational Resilience Act when it goes into effect next January should take several proactive steps as they prepare for new corporate governance, risk management, incident reporting and third-party contracting obligations, says Edward Machin at Ropes & Gray.

  • 4 Legal Privilege Lessons From Dechert Disclosure Ruling

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    The Court of Appeal's recent decision in Al Sadeq v. Dechert LLP, finding that evidence may have been incorrectly withheld, provides welcome clarification of the scope of legal professional privilege, including the application of the iniquity exception, says Tim Knight at Travers Smith.

  • BT Case May Shape UK Class Action Landscape

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    The first opt-out collective action trial commenced in Le Patourel v. BT in the U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal last month, regarding BT's abuse of dominance by overcharging millions of customers, will likely provide clarification on damages and funder returns in collective actions, which could significantly affect the class action regime, say lawyers at RPC.

  • No-Poach Agreements Face Greater EU Antitrust Scrutiny

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    EU competition authorities are increasingly viewing employer no-poach agreements as anti-competitive and an enforcement priority, demonstrating that such provisions are no longer without risk in Europe, and proving the importance of understanding EU antitrust law concerns and implications, says Robert Hardy at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Key Points From EC Economic Security Screening Initiatives

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    Lawyers at Herbert Smith analyze the European Commission's five recently announced initiatives aimed at de-risking the EU's trade and investment links with third countries, including the implementation of mandatory screening mechanisms and extending coverage to investments made by EU companies that are controlled subsidiaries of non-EU investors.

  • Following The Road Map Toward Quantum Security

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    With the Financial Conduct Authority’s recent publication of a white paper on a quantum-secure financial sector, firms should begin to consider the quantum transition early — before the process is driven by regulatory obligations — with the goal of developing a cybersecurity architecture that is agile while also allowing for quantum security, say lawyers at Cleary.

  • Why EU Ruling On Beneficial Ownership May Affect The UK

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    Following the EU judgment in Sovim v. Luxembourg that public access to beneficial ownership information conflicts with data protection rights, several British overseas territories and dependencies have recently reversed their commitment to introduce unrestricted access, and challenges to the U.K.’s liberal stance may be on the cards, says Rupert Cullen at Allectus Law.

  • UK Gov't Response Clarifies AI Regulation Approach

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    Although the U.K. government’s recent response to its artificial intelligence consultation is a clear signal of its continuing pro-innovation approach to AI regulation, high-level systems are likely to be the focus of scrutiny and organizations may consider reviewing measures they have implemented to help identify risks, say Christopher Foo and Edward Machin at Ropes & Gray.

  • Key Changes In FRC Code Aim To Promote Good Governance

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    The focus of the recently published Financial Reporting Council Corporate Governance Code on risk management and internal controls is to ensure the competitiveness of the U.K. listing regime while not compromising on governance standards, and issuers may wish to consider updating their policies in order to follow best practice, say lawyers at Debevoise.

  • Ruling In FCA Case Offers Tips On Flexible Work Requests

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    In Wilson v. Financial Conduct Authority, the Employment Tribunal recently found that the regulator's rejection of a remote work request was justified, highlighting for employers factors that affect flexible work request outcomes, while emphasizing that individual inquiries should be considered on the specific facts, say Frances Rollin, Ella Tunnell and Kerry Garcia at Stevens & Bolton.

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