Corporate

  • May 28, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Delaware Court of Chancery watchers shifted their focus last week from the courtroom to Dover's legislative hall, as proposed amendments to Delaware's corporate code were finally introduced to state lawmakers. Hearings, decisions and reversals involved Kraft-Heinz, AMC Entertainment and the merger of cryptocurrency companies BitGo and Galaxy. In case you missed it, here's the latest from Delaware's Chancery Court.  

  • May 28, 2024

    Kroger, Albertsons Must Give FTC Texts, Written Notes

    Claims from a pair of multibillion-dollar grocery giants that a discovery request will pose financial burden held no sway over a Federal Trade Commission in-house judge who last week ordered Kroger and Albertsons to produce text messages and handwritten notes from key employees as part of the agency's merger challenge.

  • May 28, 2024

    Christie's CEO Confirms Cyberattack On Auction House's Data

    The chief executive officer of Christie's said it has identified the hacking group behind a cyberattack that hit the international auction house's website just as it launched a series of live and online auctions for art and luxury goods this spring.

  • May 28, 2024

    Biz Groups Back BofA In Merger Interest Tax Fight At 4th Circ.

    Business groups told the Fourth Circuit on Tuesday that they supported Bank of America in its fight against a North Carolina federal court ruling that found the bank wasn't entitled to net the interest on the tax liabilities of Merrill Lynch after the two companies merged.

  • May 28, 2024

    Exxon Investor Broadens Promise To Nix Climate Proxy Bid

    An activist investor sued by Exxon Mobil Corp. over a now-withdrawn shareholder proposal concerning climate change has again called on the oil giant to withdraw its suit after broadening its previous promise not to resubmit the proposal in the future.

  • May 28, 2024

    $3.1B Satellite Deal Needs Justices' Review, Co. Says

    A broker accusing Lockheed Martin and Airbus of cutting it from a $3.1 billion military satellite deal opposed the Biden administration's contention that a U.S. Supreme Court review isn't needed, saying the administration incorrectly focused on an underlying F-35 deal.

  • May 28, 2024

    Simpson Thacher Hires US Treasury Alum From Blackstone

    An experienced fund transactions attorney has moved from an in-house role at Blackstone to private practice at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP, the firm said Tuesday.

  • May 28, 2024

    Coverage Recap: Day 17 Of Trump's NY Hush Money Trial

    Law360 reporters are providing live updates from the Manhattan criminal courthouse as Donald Trump goes on trial for allegedly falsifying business records related to hush money payments ahead of the 2016 election. Here's a recap from day 17.

  • May 28, 2024

    O'Reilly Auto Parts Inks $4.1M COVID Screening Settlement

    O'Reilly Auto Enterprises has agreed to pay $4.1 million to settle a California wage and hour lawsuit alleging that the company should have paid workers for the time they spent undergoing COVID-19 screenings before shifts and for work performed during meal breaks, according to a court memo.

  • May 28, 2024

    Edwards Urges Full Fed. Circ. To Limit FDA Safe Harbor

    Edwards Lifesciences has petitioned the full Federal Circuit to narrow its interpretation of a U.S. Food and Drug Administration safe harbor that essentially allows patent infringement during drug development, arguing that if Congress wanted the statute to be interpreted broadly, "it would have said exactly that."

  • May 28, 2024

    Reed Smith Gets Digital Music Pro From Calif. Boutique Firm

    Reed Smith LLP announced Tuesday it has hired a music and entertainment attorney in Los Angeles who worked at boutique entertainment law firm Granderson Des Rochers LLP, Universal Music Publishing Group and Google.

  • May 28, 2024

    Beasley Allen, J&J Trade Barbs Over DQ Bid In Talc Litigation

    Johnson & Johnson and the Beasley Allen Law Firm have accused each other by turns of "gamesmanship" and "unscrupulous conduct" in New Jersey courts in a fight over whether the firm should be disqualified from talcum powder litigation for allegedly collaborating in secret with a former J&J outside counsel.

  • May 28, 2024

    CSG Ups Bid For Vista's Sporting Biz To $1.96B

    Vista Outdoor Inc. on Tuesday announced that Czech defense company Czechoslovak Group AS increased its offer to purchase Vista's sporting products division to $1.96 billion, while the outdoor products company also noted it had rejected a $3 billion takeover bid from Dallas-based investment firm MNC Capital.

  • May 28, 2024

    FTX Exec Who Acted As Bankman-Fried 'Tool' Gets 7½ Years

    A Manhattan federal judge hit cryptocurrency finance expert and former FTX executive Ryan Salame with a 7½-year sentence Tuesday for duping a bank to authorize $1.5 billion of illegal transfers and making fraudulent campaign contributions for the exchange's convicted founder, Sam Bankman-Fried.

  • May 28, 2024

    GE General Counsel Mike Holston Heading To Paul Weiss

    The general counsel who navigated General Electric Co. through its recent split into three companies is becoming a partner at Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP on Oct. 1, where he looks forward to taking on corporate crises and maybe even a pro bono death penalty case.

  • May 24, 2024

    Live Nation Ticket Buyers Follow Feds With Antitrust Suit

    Live Nation and Ticketmaster were hit with a consumer antitrust proposed class action Thursday accusing them of monopolizing concert promotion and ticketing for major concert venues following their 2010 merger, which comes on the heels of the U.S. Department of Justice's own lawsuit.

  • May 24, 2024

    5 Themes That Could Determine Trump's NY Criminal Trial

    With closing arguments set for Tuesday morning in Donald Trump's New York hush money case and deliberations on the horizon, here's a look at the themes that have dominated the historic, monthlong trial so far.

  • May 24, 2024

    Uvalde Families Say Call Of Duty, Meta Groomed Shooter

    Families of schoolchildren shot at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, in 2022 alleged in a pair of lawsuits Friday that Meta Platforms' Instagram, the maker of first-person shooter video game Call of Duty, and a manufacturer of assault rifles helped inspire, train and equip the teenage gunman.

  • May 24, 2024

    Real Estate Authority: Adaptive Reuse, Climate Risk, SFR

    Catch up on this week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including one BigLaw real estate leader's take on adaptive reuse, the enduring risk of climate change for public companies, and the latest industry player perspectives on the single-family rental market.

  • May 24, 2024

    Top Senate Banking Dem Presses DoorDash On Biz Advances

    Food ordering and delivery platform DoorDash has come under fire from the chair of the U.S. Senate's banking committee over merchant cash advance products offered on its platform, with the lawmaker saying the typically high costs of such offerings bear "a troubling similarity to payday lending practices."

  • May 24, 2024

    SEC Hits Back At SolarWinds' 'Distortion' Allegations

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission sent a letter to a New York federal judge Friday pushing back on SolarWinds Corp.'s accusations that it was overstating and distorting its case against the government contractor over a data hack, saying its complaint is "well-grounded in facts" uncovered during its investigation.

  • May 24, 2024

    Employment Authority: Bias Claims With Hiring, Gaza Protests

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with coverage on why rejecting job applicants who participate in campus protests over the conflict in Gaza could open up employers to discrimination claims, tips for employers to stay compliant with child labor obligations this summer and how a representation election loss for the United Auto Workers at two Alabama Mercedez-Benz plants may slow the union's organizing efforts.

  • May 24, 2024

    HNTB's Liability Capped In Seattle Tunnel Delay Claim

    A contract clause caps engineering firm HNTB Corp.'s potential liability over a long-delayed Seattle highway tunnel project, a Washington state court judge ruled Friday, likely dashing a joint venture's bid to recover more than $700 million.

  • May 24, 2024

    5th Circ. Clears Co. In Case That Sparked NLRB Remedy Shift

    The Fifth Circuit on Friday vacated a National Labor Relations Board order finding an ad software company violated federal labor law by laying off workers without bargaining with a union, but did not weigh in on the legality of the expanded remedies that the board used the case to adopt. 

  • May 24, 2024

    BofA Inks $21M Deal With Over 1M Customers Over Wire Fees

    Bank of America customers on Friday urged a North Carolina federal judge to preliminarily approve their $21 million settlement to resolve claims the financial institution tacked $15 "junk fees" onto incoming wire transfers, saying the deal constitutes significant relief for over a million class members.

Expert Analysis

  • Mitigating Incarceration's Impacts On Foreign Nationals

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    Sentencing arguments that highlighted the disparate impact incarceration would have on a British national recently sentenced for insider training by a New York district court, when compared to similarly situated U.S. citizens, provide an example of the advocacy needed to avoid or mitigate problems unique to noncitizen defendants, say attorneys at Lankler Siffert.

  • Navigating Title VII Compliance And Litigation Post-Muldrow

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Muldrow v. St. Louis has broadened the scope of Title VII litigation, meaning employers must reassess their practices to ensure compliance across jurisdictions and conduct more detailed factual analyses to defend against claims effectively, say Robert Pepple and Christopher Stevens at Nixon Peabody.

  • Tiny Tweaks To Bank Merger Forms May Have Big Impact

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    The impact of proposed changes to the Federal Reserve Board's and Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.'s bank merger review forms would be significant, resulting in hundreds of additional burden hours for bank merger applicants and signaling a further shift by the prudential bank regulators toward more rigorous scrutiny of mergers, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • How CFPB Credit Card Rules Slot Into Broader Considerations

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    Swirling legal challenges against the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's recent rulemaking concerning credit card late fees raise questions about how regulated entities should respond to the bureau's rules — and how quickly they should act, say Caitlin Mandel and Elizabeth Ireland at Winston & Strawn.

  • 3 Employer Lessons From NLRB's Complaint Against SpaceX

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    Severance agreements traditionally have included nondisparagement and nondisclosure provisions as a matter of course — but a recent National Labor Relations Board complaint against SpaceX underscores the ongoing efforts to narrow severance agreements at the state and federal levels, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • Lessons On Challenging Class Plaintiffs' Expert Testimony

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    In class actions seeking damages, plaintiffs are increasingly using expert opinions to establish predominance, but several recent rulings from California federal courts shed light on how defendants can respond, say Jennifer Romano and Raija Horstman at Crowell & Moring.

  • Exploring An Alternative Model Of Litigation Finance

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    A new model of litigation finance, most aptly described as insurance-backed litigation funding, differs from traditional funding in two key ways, and the process of securing it involves three primary steps, say Bob Koneck, Christopher Le Neve Foster and Richard Butters at Atlantic Global Risk LLC.

  • Businesses Should Take Their AI Contracts Off Auto-Renew

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    When subscribing to artificial intelligence tools — or to any technology in a highly competitive and legally thorny market — companies should push back on automatic renewal contract clauses for reasons including litigation and regulatory risk, and competition, says Chris Wlach at Huge Inc.

  • Del. Dispatch: Chancery's Evolving Approach To Caremark

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    Though Caremark claims are historically the least likely corporate claims to lead to liability, such cases have been met in recent years with increased judicial receptivity — but the Delaware Court of Chancery still expressly discourages the reflexive filing of Caremark claims following corporate mishaps, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Why Employers Shouldn't Overreact To Protest Activities

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    Recent decisions from the First Circuit in Kinzer v. Whole Foods and the National Labor Relations Board in Home Depot hold eye-opening takeaways about which employee conduct is protected as "protest activity" and make a case for fighting knee-jerk reactions that could result in costly legal proceedings, says Frank Shuster at Constangy.

  • What The Justices' Copyright Damages Ruling Didn't Address

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    While the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Warner Chappell v. Nealy clarified when a copyright owner may recover damages in jurisdictions that apply the so-called discovery rule, it did not settle the overriding question of whether the Copyright Act even permits applying the rule, say Ivy Estoesta and William Milliken at Sterne Kessler.

  • Global Bribery Probes Are Complicating FCPA Compliance

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    The recent rise in collaboration between the U.S. Department of Justice and foreign authorities in bribery enforcement can not only affect companies' legal exposure as resolution approaches vary by country, but also the decision of when and whether to disclose Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations to the DOJ, say Samantha Badlam and Catherine Conroy at Ropes & Gray.

  • Series

    Teaching Yoga Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Being a yoga instructor has helped me develop my confidence and authenticity, as well as stress management and people skills — all of which have crossed over into my career as an attorney, says Laura Gongaware at Clyde & Co.

  • A Vision For Economic Clerkships In The Legal System

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    As courts handle increasingly complex damages analyses involving vast amounts of data, an economic clerkship program — integrating early-career economists into the judicial system — could improve legal outcomes and provide essential training to clerks, say Mona Birjandi at Data for Decisions and Matt Farber at Secretariat.

  • When The Platform Is A Product, Strict Liability Can Attach

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    A New York state court's recent ruling in Patterson v. Meta, holding that social media platforms can be considered products, appears to be the first of its kind — but if it is upheld and adopted by other courts, the liability implications for internet companies could be incredibly far-reaching, say attorneys at Patterson Belknap.

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