Wage & Hour

  • May 15, 2024

    Last-Mile Amazon Driver Does Interstate Work, Panel Says

    A driver for a logistics company who primarily made local deliveries for Amazon was engaged in interstate commerce and thus exempt from mandatory arbitration, a California appeals court has held, saying the worker's wage and hour claims can remain in state court.

  • May 15, 2024

    IT Recruiters Pursue Win Against Staffing Co. In OT Class Suit

    Recruiters for tech staffing company TEKsystems have asked a California federal judge to award them a pretrial win on their claim that the company misclassified them, saying recruiters are entry-level employees, not managers, so they don't qualify for the narrow exemption to California's overtime statute.

  • May 15, 2024

    Chemical Biz's Worker Numbers Can't Keep Wage Suit Federal

    A chemical company failed to show that more than 100 workers would be part of a proposed class in a suit claiming unpaid wages, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled, sending the suit back to state court.

  • May 15, 2024

    Toss Of Bonus Bias Claim Too Short On Details, 5th Circ. Says

    The Fifth Circuit has reinstated a Hispanic salesman's claim that he was denied $160,000 in bonuses by a construction contractor out of racial bias after he was fired, ruling the lower court didn't adequately explain why it nixed that allegation.

  • May 15, 2024

    FedEx Contractor Wage Deal Needs Work, Judge Rules

    A California federal judge wouldn't sign off on a settlement for more than $33,000 between a FedEx contractor and delivery drivers to partly end a wage suit that named both FedEx and the contractor, telling the parties the terms lacked necessary information.

  • May 14, 2024

    Venable Opens Colo. Office With 8 Sherman & Howard Attys

    Venable LLP is growing its presence by opening its first office in Colorado, with eight commercial and employment attorneys from Sherman & Howard LLP opening its Denver location, which will be headed by partner-in-charge James "Jim" Sawtelle, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    Conn. Retaliation Suit Advances After Justices' Title VII Ruling

    With a recent U.S. Supreme Court opinion said to be illuminating the path forward, a federal judge in Connecticut has declined to dismiss a case by a self-described former "high-level" employee of a private equity firm who alleges she was fired after raising concerns about her employer's treatment of women.

  • May 14, 2024

    Revised $2.25M Walmart OT Deal Fails For Lack Of Changes

    A California federal judge again refused to approve a $2.25 million deal between Walmart and 1,700 workers that would resolve an unpaid overtime lawsuit, finding that the modified agreement did not fix deficiencies the court had previously identified in the settlement's distribution method.

  • May 14, 2024

    Intervenors Can't Convince Appeals Court to Ax PAGA Deal

    A California state appeals court found that a trial court properly evaluated and approved a deal ending a Private Attorneys General Act lawsuit, disagreeing that intervenors were owed input in the case and rejecting the state labor department's assertion that the settlement was a "reverse auction."

  • May 14, 2024

    Domino's Operator Can't Arbitrate Car Reimbursement Suit

    The operator of Domino's Pizza franchise stores can't push into arbitration a driver's suit claiming under-reimbursement, a Tennessee federal judge ruled, saying the operator is not part of an arbitration pact the worker signed.

  • May 14, 2024

    Eli Lilly Can Challenge Collective Cert. Ruling In Age Bias Suit

    An Indiana federal judge said Eli Lilly & Co. can immediately appeal a decision certifying a collective in a suit accusing the pharmaceutical company of favoring millennials over older workers for promotions, agreeing that the Seventh Circuit should clarify the requirements for moving forward collectively.

  • May 14, 2024

    California Pot Worker's Suit Alleges Slurs, Unpaid Overtime

    A former worker for a cannabis cultivator and distributor is suing his former employer in California state court, saying he was fired in retaliation for reporting a work environment rife with racial discrimination.

  • May 14, 2024

    Lyft Driver Urges Justices Not To Review PAGA Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court already made clear that state courts "have the last word" on the arbitration fate of nonindividual Private Attorneys General Act claims, a Lyft driver said, saying there's no need for the justices to weigh in on his misclassification case.

  • May 14, 2024

    DOL Scores Order To Stop Diner From Intimidating Workers

    An Indiana diner must stop retaliating against workers cooperating with a U.S. Department of Labor probe into its pay practices after a federal judge granted the agency's request for an injunction.

  • May 14, 2024

    DoorDash's $664K Misclassification Deal Gets Final Approval

    A California federal judge gave the final sign-off on a $664,000 settlement ending claims that DoorDash misclassified delivery drivers as independent contractors and failed to pay minimum wage, finding the terms to be a fair resolution of the dispute.

  • May 13, 2024

    Driver Asks For Discovery Greenlight After 6th Circ. Ruling

    A driver for a Domino's franchisee told an Ohio federal court his suit claiming under-reimbursement for vehicle-related expenses should proceed normally after the Sixth Circuit weighed in, saying the appellate court's decision doesn't lead to a different way forward.

  • May 13, 2024

    Calif. Hyatt's $725K Wage Deal Scores Final OK

    A California federal judge Monday placed the final stamp of approval on a $725,000 deal resolving over 600 workers' wage claims against Hyatt, finding the terms to be a reasonable resolution, but trimmed the workers' attorney fees award because the case didn't warrant a larger-than-usual award.

  • May 13, 2024

    DOL Says Policy Disagreement Not Enough To Nix H-2A Rule

    The U.S. Department of Labor rejected a group of farms' criticisms of new H-2A agricultural wages as a mere policy disagreement, telling a North Carolina federal court that the rule was appropriately enacted after taking stock of its potential financial effects.

  • May 13, 2024

    NJ Justices Hold Contract Supersedes Real Estate Wage Law

    The contract a real estate agent signed deeming him an independent contractor is enough to resolve his claims of improper wage deductions, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Monday, saying that a state three-prong test doesn't need to apply.

  • May 13, 2024

    Popeye's Franchisee, DOL End Probe Interference Suit

    A Popeye's franchisee and one of its managers will end a U.S. Department of Labor suit in Pennsylvania federal court claiming they lied to and threatened department investigators, after a federal judge approved a deal Monday.

  • May 13, 2024

    Ex-Raleigh Cop Wants OT Suit Kept Alive

    An ex-police officer accusing the City of Raleigh, North Carolina, of forcing its officers to accept time off instead of overtime urged a federal court to deny the city's request to toss the suit, saying the city should be held accountable for failing to pay overtime.

  • May 13, 2024

    Workers Want $775K In Atty Fees After Multistate Wage Verdict

    An attorney who secured a six-figure judgment in a multistate wage class action against an Apple-affiliated repair company has asked for more than $775,000 in fees, citing her opponents' "aggressive" litigation tactics and the significant risk she incurred in taking on the case.

  • May 13, 2024

    Uber, Lyft Put Driver Work Fight In Reverse As Trial Begins

    A high-stakes battle over the employment status of drivers for Uber and Lyft kicked off in Massachusetts on Monday, as the companies sought to flip the government allegations by arguing that the ride-hailing giants work for their drivers, not the other way around.

  • May 13, 2024

    Rail Worker Wage Case Won't Get High Court Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court won't intervene in a pending Massachusetts lawsuit against the operator of a freight rail line over whether its employees are covered by the state's Prevailing Wage Act, declining Monday to review the case.

  • May 13, 2024

    Ind. Home Health Co. Pays $151K For OT Violations

    A home healthcare company in Indianapolis paid more than $151,000 in back wages and damages for denying 32 workers overtime rates, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

Expert Analysis

  • Wage Transparency Laws Create Labor Cert. Hurdles

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    A business-as-usual approach to labor certification amid the influx of new wage transparency laws in different jurisdictions is untenable, especially for employers with liberal remote work options and locations in numerous states, say Eleanor Pelta and Whitney Lohr at Morgan Lewis.

  • Key Calif. Law Changes Employers Should Know This Year

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    With many of the California employment laws passed last year already in effect, now is the time for companies to update their handbooks and policies regarding off-work cannabis use, reproductive health protections, pay data reporting and more, say Lisa Reimbold and Monique Eginli at Clark Hill.

  • Top 10 Employer Resolutions For 2023

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    A recent wave of pivotal judicial, legislative and executive actions has placed an even greater responsibility on employers to reevaluate existing protocols, examine fundamental aspects of culture and employee relations, and update policies and guidelines to ensure continued compliance with the law, say Allegra Lawrence-Hardy and Bria Stephens at Lawrence & Bundy.

  • Preparing For Potential Changes To DOL's Overtime Rules

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    While the U.S. Department of Labor is still reviewing employer exemptions from Fair Labor Standards Act wage and overtime requirements, and it is difficult to predict changes the department may ultimately propose, there are a few steps that employers can take now, say Juan Enjamio and Daniel Butler at Hunton.

  • Cost-Splitting Arbitration Clauses Threaten Workers' Rights

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    A recent Law360 guest article offered employers a guide to enforcing cost-splitting arbitration provisions in employment contracts but failed to recognize that these steps deter employees from asserting statutory claims for employment law violations, says Hugh Baran at Kakalec Law.

  • Pa.'s Changing Employment Laws In 2022 And Beyond

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    With pandemic concerns no longer drowning out other topics in Pennsylvania employment law, 2022 instead saw a variety of worker-friendly changes introduced at the state and local levels, a trend that may continue to grow in 2023 under Gov.-elect Josh Shapiro, say J.T. Holt and Claire Throckmorton at Reed Smith.

  • Musician Classification Pointers For Wash. Hospitality Cos.

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    Following a recent increase in audits by the Washington State Employment Security Department concerning hospitality employers’ classification of musical performers, businesses are strongly encouraged to assess state law requirements governing their relationship with hired talent and ensure written contracts are in place, say Emily Bushaw and Shannon McDermott at Perkins Coie.

  • Employer Ramifications From Wash. Prevailing Wage Ruling

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    After the Washington Supreme Court's recent ruling in Associated General Contractors v. Washington that altered how prevailing wage rates are set, employers of public works projects can expect to see higher wage rates for their employees, say Cassidy Ingram and Brett Hill at Ahlers Cressman.

  • In 2023, Pursue The 'Why' Behind Employment Compliance

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    As employers approach new compliance requirements that will take effect on Jan.1, considering why these laws and regulations were put in place — rather than what must be done to satisfy them — can open greater opportunities to move ahead of the curve and align actions with company values and culture, says Christopher Ward at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employee Pay Takeaways From Computer Startup Time Ruling

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent ruling in Cadena v. Customer Connexx, which held that time spent booting up laptops is compensable, is a reminder of how the continuous workday rule affects employee pay and provides insight on whether other types of tasks are integral and indispensable, say attorneys at Husch Blackwell.

  • IRS Starts Clock On Energy Projects' Labor Rule Exemption

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    A U.S. Department of the Treasury notice published this week started the 60-day clock for clean energy projects seeking to be grandfathered from having to meet new labor requirements to qualify for enhanced tax credits, and uncertainty about how the provisions will apply should be incentive for some investors to begin construction soon, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Top 10 Labor And Employment Issues In M&A Transactions

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    In order to ensure that M&A transactions come to fruition in the current uncertain environment, companies should keep several labor and employment issues in mind during the due diligence process to minimize risk, says Cassidy Mara at Akerman.

  • Employer Lessons From Google's $118M Equal Pay Deal

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    The recent $118 million settlement in the Ellis v. Google class action over a systemic scheme directed at underpaying women can be used as the foundation for employers to implement better business practices and avoid lawsuits of this magnitude, say attorneys at Gordon & Rees.