Employment UK

  • May 01, 2024

    Ex-Cartwright King Lawyer Denies Post Office Stalling Tactic

    A former Cartwright King lawyer who prosecuted people for the Post Office based on faulty IT data denied there was a "tactic" to delay the disclosure of vital evidence to the defense, as he gave evidence to the inquiry into the Horizon scandal on Wednesday.

  • May 01, 2024

    Pension Body Warns On Gov't Equity Investment Plan

    U.K. government plans to impose public disclosures on pension funds would increase the burden on the industry and harm savers by encouraging investment in low-return businesses, according to an industry paper published Wednesday.

  • May 01, 2024

    Council Employee Wins Appeal Over Discriminatory Dismissal

    A tribunal should not have ignored the discriminatory element of a council worker's constructive dismissal case even though her complaint of discrimination fell off the list of issues that she submitted, a London appeals judge has ruled.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy VP Says CEO Lynch Told Him To Lie To Investors

    A former Autonomy business development executive testified Tuesday that CEO Mike Lynch directed him to lie to a hedge fund investor about prepaid royalty deals that boosted the company's upfront revenue numbers, saying at Lynch's criminal fraud trial that it was hard to say no to the "big boss."

  • April 30, 2024

    Cartwright King Warned Post Office Of Giving Defense Ammo

    A Cartwright King lawyer warned that the Post Office announcing an independent review into the IT system used to wrongfully prosecute innocent people would "give ammunition" to the defense, according to documents disclosed to the inquiry into the scandal Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    Deliveroo, Uber Eats Commit To Extra Illegal Working Checks

    Food delivery giants Deliveroo, Just Eat and Uber Eats have agreed to extra security checks to stop delivery drivers from sharing their accounts in a bid to crack down on drivers working illegally, the U.K. government announced Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    Care Home To Pay £63K After Forcing Whistleblower Out

    An employment tribunal has ordered a children's care company to pay £63,400 ($80,000) to a deputy head, after it punished him for raising concerns about the separation of three siblings and subsequently forced him to resign.

  • April 30, 2024

    FCA Flexibility On Pension Dashboard Wins Industry Applause

    The Association of British Insurers said on Tuesday that Financial Conduct Authority rules that modify how firms can connect their data to the pension dashboard service were a "welcome step," and will improve connection to the long-awaited retirement savings program.

  • April 30, 2024

    Office Administrator Who Was Forced To Resign Wins £6K

    An office administrator for a rural women's association in north England has won over £6,000 ($7,520) in a case accusing the association of unlawfully pushing her out when her relationship with the committee chair broke down.

  • April 30, 2024

    NHS Wrongly Blocked Whistleblowing Staffer From Working

    A National Health Service trust wrongly stopped an employee from returning to work following a sickness absence after he blew the whistle on patient health risks amid concerns over which medicines his colleagues were prescribing, a tribunal has ruled.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ex-DWF Barrister Disbarred Over False Discrimination Claims

    A tribunal disbarred a formed DWF barrister on Tuesday after concluding that he had dishonestly targeted his boss with false allegations of homophobia and racism, possibly to deflect attention from complaints of misconduct made against him.

  • April 30, 2024

    FIFA Player Transfer Rules Could Break EU Antitrust Laws

    FIFA's transfer rules that entitle football clubs to compensation from players and their new clubs when they cut their contract short to switch teams could be unlawful under European Union antitrust laws, an adviser to the bloc's top court said on Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    UK Pension Deal Market Sees Surge In Smaller Transactions

    The number of pension deals worth less than £100 million ($125 million) rose 10% in 2023, according to data released on Tuesday by Aon PLC, as doubts grow over the need for a state-backed consolidator of retirement savings plans.

  • April 29, 2024

    'I Don't Want To Try That Case,' Judge Tells Mike Lynch's Atty

    The California federal judge overseeing Autonomy founder Michael Lynch's fraud trial over claims he duped HP into paying an inflated $11.7 billion for his company pushed back Monday against an attempt by Lynch's lawyer to introduce evidence of events that took place after the acquisition, saying, "I don't want to try that case."

  • April 29, 2024

    Regulator To Pay £58K For Harassing Gender Critical Worker

    An employment tribunal ordered Westminster City Council and Social Work England to pay £58,344 ($73,284) to a suspended social worker they accused of posting antitransgender content online.

  • April 29, 2024

    DWF Barrister Made False Discrimination Claims, BSB Says

    A former DWF LLP barrister is facing disciplinary action over allegations that he dishonestly and deliberately targeted his boss with false accusations of homophobia and racism.

  • April 29, 2024

    Nurse's Slave Trade Comment Claim Too Late, Tribunal Rules

    An employment tribunal has ruled that a clinical manager at a London hospice left it too late to bring a race harassment claim alleging a hospice doctor asked her why slaves were taken to America instead of England.

  • April 29, 2024

    More Post Office Convictions Sent For Appeal

    The Criminal Cases Review Commission said on Monday that it has sent the cases of five more Post Office workers who were convicted during the Horizon IT scandal to the Crown Court for appeal, the latest in a string of proceedings to head for review after the major miscarriage of justice.

  • April 29, 2024

    BT Unit Must Rehire, Pay £84K To Unfairly Axed Engineer

    A subsidiary of BT must have reinstated a fired engineer and paid him £83,800 ($105,000) by Monday after bosses unfairly cut him loose for allegedly bullying a colleague without hearing both sides of the story, a tribunal has ruled.

  • April 29, 2024

    Lawyer's Death Puts Spotlight On Industry's All-Hours Culture

    Law firms are churning out mental health policies and well-being initiatives, but an inquest into the death of Vanessa Ford, a transactions partner at Pinsent Masons LLP, has shone an uncomfortable light on the sector's long-hours culture.

  • April 26, 2024

    NHS Trust Must Pay £74K, Apologize To COVID Whistleblower

    A National Health Service trust must pay £73,900 ($92,300) and apologize to one of its surgeons after punishing him for blowing the whistle on the risks of face-to-face appointments amid the COVID-19 pandemic, a tribunal has ruled.

  • April 26, 2024

    Businessman Gets 4 Years For Fraud During Directorship Ban

    A businessman who defrauded a pensioner of £60,000 ($75,000) and ran companies while barred from doing so, has been sentenced to four years in prison, the Insolvency Service said on Friday.

  • April 26, 2024

    UK Workers Back Gov't 'Pot For Life' Pension Proposals

    Proposals for single pension pots for life have cross-generational support from U.K. workers, according to the results of a survey by a cross-party policy think tank that were published Friday.

  • April 26, 2024

    Law Firm Office Manager Gets OK For Disability Bias Claim

    A law firm office manager can sue his bosses for disability discrimination after an employment tribunal ruled that his flat feet condition was affecting him daily when they decided to make him redundant.

  • April 26, 2024

    Black Met Constable Wins £25K In Race Bias Claim

    An employment tribunal ordered the Metropolitan Police commissioner to pay £25,403 ($31,790) to a Black constable, after ruling that a sergeant had discriminated against him by remarking that he had stared "menacingly."

Expert Analysis

  • Pension Plan Amendment Power Lessons From BBC Ruling

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    The High Court's recent ruling in BBC v. BBC Pension Trust upheld an unusually restrictive fetter on the pension scheme's amendment power, which highlights how fetters can vary in degrees of protection and the importance of carefully considering any restriction, says Maxwell Ballad at Freeths.

  • What To Know About The EU Residency Scheme Changes

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    The U.K. government recently announced extensions to residency status under the EU Settlement Scheme, which is a net positive for U.K.-EU relations and will be welcomed by those affected, including employers concerned about losing employees with expired permission, say Claire Nilson and Abilio Jaribu at Faegre Drinker.

  • FCA Consumer Duty May Pose Enforcement Challenges

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    The new U.K. Financial Conduct Authority consumer duty sets higher standards of customer protection and transparency for financial services firms, but given the myriad products available across the sector, policing the regulations is going to be a challenging task, says Alessio Ianiello at Keller Postman.

  • Employer Strategies For Fixing Motherhood Pay Gap

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    Armed with an understanding of new research from The Fawcett Society covering the impact of motherhood on the pay and economic engagement of different ethnic groups, there are a number of tools employers can leverage to reduce the pay gap, say Simon Kerr-Davis and Kloe Halls at Linklaters.

  • How The UK Visa Scheme Expansion May Plug Labor Gaps

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    Amid ongoing labor shortages, the U.K. government's proposed expansion of the youth mobility scheme could address gaps in the retail and hospitality sectors by freeing employers of the cost and bureaucracy associated with sponsorship, says Katie Newbury at Kingsley Napley.

  • Key Changes In Belarusian Foreign Labor Migration Law

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    Employers should be aware of the recent changes to the labor migration law in Belarus, which provides new permit requirements and amends employers' obligations toward employed migrants, to avoid unnecessary time and financial waste, says Stefan Tomchyk at Sorainen.

  • Employer Steps Ahead Of Sexual Harassment Prevention Law

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    A new Parliamentary bill on employers' duties to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace is expected to enter into force next year, so companies should prepare by rethinking their prevention strategies to avoid fines or being investigated by the Equality and Human Rights Commission, says Joanne Moseley at Irwin Mitchell.

  • Reputation Management Lessons From Spacey Case

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    While a U.K. jury recently acquitted actor Kevin Spacey of sexual assault charges, his reputation has been harmed, illustrating the importance for lawyers to balance a client's right to privacy with media engagement throughout the criminal process, says Jessica Welch at Simkins.

  • New Solicitor Workplace Rules Present Practical Challenges

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    As law firms and partners are beginning to understand and apply the Solicitors Regulation Authority's new rules and guidance on unfair treatment toward colleagues, it is becoming clear that there are a number of potential pitfalls to navigate, says Andrew Pavlovic at CM Murray.

  • What Trustees Must Know About Virgin Media Pension Case

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    The High Court's recent decision in Virgin Media v. NTL Trustees could have significant consequences for salary-related contracted-out schemes, making it necessary for trustees to start examining any deeds of amendment during the affected time period, says James Newcome at Wedlake Bell.

  • 4 ADR Techniques To Know In Employment Cases

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    With increasing pressure on Employment Tribunal resources and recent presidential guidance highlighting alternative dispute resolution methods, practitioners should know the key types of ADR available for employment claims, how they differ and what the likely future implications are for those involved in tribunal litigation, says Sarah Hooton at Browne Jacobson.

  • Gender Diverse Boards May Reduce Corporate Fraud Risk

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    Following the recently proposed "failure to prevent fraud" offense, companies should focus on diversity in leadership as research shows that an increase in women's representation on boards is associated with a decreased probability of fraud, say Anoushka Warlow and Suzanne Gallagher at BCL Solicitors.

  • Trustees Should Take Caution After UK Pension Tap Plan

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    The U.K. government's recent plan to boost technology startups by tapping into pension sector funds may risk the hard-earned savings of members, so trustees need to be mindful of the proposals in light of their fiduciary duties, say Beth Brown and Riccardo Bruno at Arc Pensions.

  • Why Law Firms Should Consider Apprenticeships

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    A recent government briefing shows that young people are increasingly signing up for apprenticeships, a trend that law firms should take advantage of to improve socioeconomic diversity and help to recruit a variety of talent, which can boost employee retention in the long run, says Emma O'Connor at Boyes Turner.

  • The Importance Of A Proactive Approach To Workplace Safety

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    Two recent Crown Court cases regarding gross negligence manslaughter highlight the costs of failing to prioritize safety at work, which should act as a catalyst for companies to review and update their health and safety policies, say lawyers at Fieldfisher.

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