Financial Services UK

  • May 22, 2024

    City Group Warns Financial Fraud Still Major Problem

    A City trade body for financial institutions said Tuesday that payment fraud remains a major problem, with criminals stealing more than £1 billion ($1.27 billion) in 2023, shifting into growth areas such as mobile banking.

  • May 22, 2024

    Swiss Gov't Adopts Proposals For Tougher AML Laws

    Switzerland on Wednesday approved a new anti-money laundering framework that will introduce a register in which companies and other legal entities in the country will have to disclose information on their beneficial owners in a major shift in its anti-money laundering rules.

  • May 22, 2024

    UK Dependency To Implement Pillar 2 Starting In 2025

    The island of Jersey, a U.K. crown dependency, said it would implement the international minimum tax for large corporations known as Pillar Two, with the law taking effect next year.

  • May 22, 2024

    HSBC Rejects Ex-Football Pro's £2M Loan Dispute

    HSBC has denied losing former professional footballer Matthew Jansen almost £2 million ($2.5 million) by allegedly failing to monitor the risk of loans secured against properties during the 2008 financial crisis, claiming the sportsman could have kept track himself.

  • May 22, 2024

    Chinese Woman Faces Oct. Criminal Crypto Possession Trial

    A Chinese woman and her alleged accomplice are scheduled to stand trial in London in October, charged with criminal possession and transfer of cryptocurrency, a judge said Wednesday.

  • May 22, 2024

    Digital Assets Investor To Return Up To £34M To Shareholders

    Phoenix Digital Assets PLC launched on Wednesday a share repurchase program worth up to £33.7 million (£43 million), a move guided by Fladgate LLP, following the sale of some of its assets.

  • May 22, 2024

    EU Watchdog Seeks New Powers For Markets Regulation

    The European Union's financial markets watchdog called Tuesday for more regulatory powers and a simplified rulebook to improve the bloc's declining global competitiveness.

  • May 22, 2024

    Greenberg-Led SPAC To Buy Safety Biz For $1.85B, Quit LSE

    Admiral said on Wednesday that it has agreed to buy industry safety company Acuren for $1.85 billion, as the blank-check business seeks a slice of the growing and resilient infrastructure inspection sector.

  • May 22, 2024

    Citigroup Fined £61.6M For Trading Systems Failings

    Two finance regulators said Wednesday they have fined Citigroup Global Markets Ltd. a total of £61.6 million ($78.4 million) for failures in trading systems that led to the lender mistakenly selling $1.4 billion in equities into European markets.

  • May 21, 2024

    EU Gives Final Approval To World's First AI Rulebook

    European Union law negotiators gave the final green light on Tuesday to the first worldwide rules on artificial intelligence across most sectors including financial services, classifying its usage in bank lending risk assessments or insurance underwriting for EU citizens as high-risk.

  • May 21, 2024

    Denmark's Sydbank To Acquire Local Coop Bank For $50M

    Danish lender Sydbank said Tuesday that it has agreed to acquire the country's Coop Bank AS from its parent company for a preliminary purchase price of 345 million Danish kroner ($50.2 million), in addition to signing a partnership agreement.

  • May 21, 2024

    I Am An Honest Man, British Trader Tells £1.4B Fraud Trial

    Sanjay Shah, a former hedge fund owner who is accused of defrauding Denmark's tax authority out of £1.4 billion ($1.8 billion), told a London court on Tuesday that he is an "honest man" who traded using a legal "loophole."

  • May 21, 2024

    Finance Pros 'Too Afraid' To Blow Whistle On Fraud

    More than three-quarters of finance professionals in the U.K. stayed silent after spotting or suspecting internal fraud in their workplaces, a survey published on Tuesday showed, with nearly half saying they feared a backlash.

  • May 21, 2024

    Credit Union In Default, £2.6M Compensation Expected

    The Financial Services Compensation Scheme said Tuesday it will protect the members of Castle & Crystal Credit Union Ltd. as the financial company entered into administration.

  • May 21, 2024

    UK Pension Reform Could Create 'Too Big To Fail' Providers

    The proposed government fix for the spiraling number of retirement savings pots could create pension giants that are too big to fail, an industry body warned on Tuesday.

  • May 21, 2024

    Mastercard, Visa Fee Hikes Face UK Competition Scrutiny

    The Payment Systems Regulator said Tuesday that the two biggest card operators, Mastercard and Visa, do not give value for money on their services and that it will take steps to hold them more accountable.

  • May 21, 2024

    Ex-Insurance Exec's Wife Denies Knowledge Of Illegal Money

    The wife of a former executive at Gable Insurance has denied cashing in on unauthorized payments from her husband who, the Liechtenstein insurer alleges, siphoned off millions of pounds from the company to accounts he had links to.

  • May 21, 2024

    Hayes Gets Lifeline In Bid To Overturn Libor Conviction

    An English appellate court on Tuesday opened the door for two traders convicted of manipulating benchmark interest rates to appeal to the U.K.'s top court but said that the justices must decide whether to hear the case. 

  • May 20, 2024

    Autonomy CEO Reaped $516M From HP Acquisition, Jurors Told

    Ex-Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch took home more than $516 million from the software company's $11.7 billion sale to HP, an FBI agent testified Monday as the government's last witness in a trial over allegations Lynch duped HP into overpaying to buy the company.

  • May 20, 2024

    SFO Seizes Cash In Bank Account Linked To Nigerian Bribery

    Britian's anti-corruption agency has seized more than £36,000 ($46,000) from the former managing director of an African state-owned banknote printing company after prosecutors traced the money to a bribery scheme. 

  • May 20, 2024

    Collapsed Firm Escapes Fine For Making Unapproved Claims

    The solicitors' watchdog for England and Wales on Monday waived a £65,300 ($83,000) fine for a shuttered law firm that submitted claims without clients' approval, scrapping the penalty to safeguard the outfit's creditors.

  • May 20, 2024

    Lessors File Russia-Stranded Planes Cases After Major Ruling

    Two aircraft lessors have filed details of claims against insurers in London for a combined total of $62.1 million over planes stranded in Russia because of the invasion of Ukraine after a landmark ruling tossed attempts to move the cases and others to Russia.

  • May 20, 2024

    UK Leads Europe In Financial Services Investment, EY Says

    The U.K. has solidified its position as Europe's top destination for foreign direct investment in financial services as it attracted 108 investment projects in 2023 compared to 76 a year earlier, the Big Four accounting firm EY said Monday.

  • May 20, 2024

    Step Up Action On Financial Abuse, FCA Tells Firms

    The Financial Conduct Authority has called on regulated firms to take further steps to stop financial abuse of individuals through manipulation of banking or insurance products as it looks through the lens of the Consumer Duty.

  • May 20, 2024

    Crypto 'Inventor' Used Court As Vehicle For Fraud, Judge Says

    A London court ruled Monday that the man who claimed to be Satoshi Nakamoto in a weekslong trial lied extensively and committed forgery "on a grand scale," finding that the computer scientist had used the courts as a "vehicle for fraud."

Expert Analysis

  • New Russia Sanctions Reveal Int'l Enforcement Capabilities

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    Significant new U.K., U.S. and EU sanctions imposed on Russia notably target Europe-based individuals and entities accused of sanctions evasion, and with an apparent political will to enhance capabilities, the rhetoric is translating into international enforcement activity, say lawyers at Cadwalader.

  • What COVID Payout Ruling Means For Lockdown Loss Claims

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    While the High Court's recent COVID-19 payout decision in Gatwick v. Liberty Mutual, holding that pandemic-related regulations trigger prevention of access clauses, will likely lead to insurers accepting more business interruption claims, there are still evidentiary challenges and issues regarding policy limits and furlough, say Josianne El Antoury and Greg Lascelles at Covington.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EEA Equivalence Statement Is Welcomed By Fund Managers

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    The recent statement confirming European Economic Area equivalence to undertakings for collective investment in transferable securities for U.K. overseas funds regime purposes removes many managers’ concerns in the wake of Brexit, giving a clear pathway out of temporary marketing permissions and easing the transition from one regime to another, says Catherine Weeks at Simmons & Simmons.

  • In Int'l Arbitration Agreements, Be Clear About Governing Law

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    A trilogy of recent cases in the English High Court and Court of Appeal highlight the importance of parties agreeing to explicit choice of law language at the outset of an arbitration agreement in order to avoid costly legal skirmishes down the road, say lawyers at Faegre Drinker.

  • Crypto As A Coin Of The Corporate Realm: The Pros And Cons

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    The broadened range of crypto-assets opens up new possibilities for employers looking to recruit, incentivize and retain employees through the use of crypto, but certain risks must be addressed, say Dan Sharman and Sunny Mangatt at Shoosmiths.

  • Comparing UK And EU's View On 3rd-Party Service Providers

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    The U.K. is taking welcome steps to address the lack of direct oversight over critical third-party service providers, and although less onerous than that of the EU Digital Operational Resilience Act, the U.K. regime's proportionate approach is designed to make providers more robust and reliable, say lawyers at Shearman.

  • Key Points Of BoE Response To Digital Pound Consultation

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    Lawyers at Hogan Lovells analyze the recent Bank of England and U.K. government response to a consultation on the launch of a digital pound, finding that the phased approach to evaluating the issues makes sense given the significant potential impact on the U.K. economy.

  • Goldman Prosecution Delivers A Clear Sign Of FCA Strength

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    The recent successful prosecution of a former Goldman Sachs analyst for insider dealing and fraud is a reminder to regulated individuals that economic crime will never be tolerated, and that the Financial Conduct Authority is willing to bare its teeth in the exercise of its prosecutorial remit, says Doug Cherry at Fladgate.

  • The Good, The Bad And The New Of The UK Sanctions Regime

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    Almost six years after the Sanctions and Money Laundering Act was introduced, the U.K. government has published a strategy paper that outlines its focus points and unveils potential changes to the regime, such as a new humanitarian exception for financial sanctions, highlighting the rapid transformation of the U.K. sanctions landscape, says Josef Rybacki at WilmerHale.

  • A Look At Environment Agency's New Economic Crime Unit

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    Sophie Wood at Kingsley Napley explains how the Environment Agency’s newly established Economic Crime Unit will pursue criminal money flows from environmental offenses, and discusses the unit’s civil powers, including the ability to administer account freezing and forfeiture orders, says Sophie Wood at Kingsley Napley.

  • Opinion

    UK Whistleblowers Flock To The US For Good Reason

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    The U.K. Serious Fraud Office director recently brought renewed attention to the differences between the U.K. and U.S. whistleblower regimes — differences that may make reporting to U.S. agencies a better and safer option for U.K. whistleblowers, and show why U.K. whistleblower laws need to be improved, say Benjamin Calitri and Kate Reeves at Kohn Kohn.

  • 4 Legal Privilege Lessons From Dechert Disclosure Ruling

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    The Court of Appeal's recent decision in Al Sadeq v. Dechert LLP, finding that evidence may have been incorrectly withheld, provides welcome clarification of the scope of legal professional privilege, including the application of the iniquity exception, says Tim Knight at Travers Smith.

  • BT Case May Shape UK Class Action Landscape

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    The first opt-out collective action trial commenced in Le Patourel v. BT in the U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal last month, regarding BT's abuse of dominance by overcharging millions of customers, will likely provide clarification on damages and funder returns in collective actions, which could significantly affect the class action regime, say lawyers at RPC.

  • Key Points From EC Economic Security Screening Initiatives

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    Lawyers at Herbert Smith analyze the European Commission's five recently announced initiatives aimed at de-risking the EU's trade and investment links with third countries, including the implementation of mandatory screening mechanisms and extending coverage to investments made by EU companies that are controlled subsidiaries of non-EU investors.

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