Legal Ethics

  • April 18, 2024

    Ex-BigLaw Atty Can Stay Free During OneCoin Fraud Appeal

    A Manhattan federal judge Thursday granted a former Locke Lord LLP partner's motion for bail pending appeal of his 10-year prison sentence after he was found guilty of laundering around $400 million in proceeds from the global OneCoin cryptocurrency scam, saying he does not pose a flight risk given his medical conditions.

  • April 18, 2024

    SEC Faces $1.8M Atty Fee Bid After Sanctions In Crypto Case

    A court-appointed receiver and defendants in the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's case against crypto project Debt Box requested Wednesday that the regulator pay roughly $1.8 million in sanctions to cover the fees incurred by an allegedly ill-gotten temporary restraining order and receivership.

  • April 18, 2024

    State Sen. Tells Ga. Judge It's 'Fact' He Was 2020 Elector

    Georgia state Sen. Shawn Still, who was indicted alongside former President Donald Trump and over a dozen others last August, urged the judge overseeing the state's election interference case to accept as fact that he was an "elected and qualified" Republican presidential elector from Georgia during the 2020 presidential election.

  • April 18, 2024

    Dunn Can't Nix Fiduciary Breach Charge As Ethics Trial Wraps

    A California state bar judge denied Joseph Dunn's bid at the close of his disciplinary trial Thursday to toss a fiduciary breach charge, rejecting the former state bar executive director's argument that no evidence had been introduced to support the allegation.

  • April 18, 2024

    Perkins Coie 'Beating A Dead Horse' To Duck Case, Judge Says

    An Illinois judge on Thursday refused to reconsider his decision to let an investment company move ahead with its lawsuit accusing Perkins Coie of helping the company's former investment manager steal $12 million and opted not to certify questions raised by the firm about his reasoning to the Illinois Supreme Court.

  • April 18, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Maintains Newman Can't Invalidate Disability Law

    Suspended U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman has still not proven that the Judicial Conduct and Disability Act has no constitutional uses and should therefore be invalidated, the Federal Circuit's judicial council told a D.C. federal judge Thursday.

  • April 18, 2024

    Trump Again Seeks Delay In Fla., Says Attys Tied Up In NY

    Counsel for Donald Trump in the ex-president's federal classified documents case in Florida again asked on Thursday to extend disclosure deadlines, contending that their client would be prejudiced without more time while some of them defend Trump in his hush money case in New York.

  • April 18, 2024

    Tully Rinckey Fights Suspension Bid In Atty Contract Dust-Up

    An attorney for Tully Rinckey PLLC's two founders told a D.C. legal ethics board on Thursday that a proposal to suspend his clients over restrictions the firm placed on departing lawyers was "a totally disproportionate response" to the allegations against them.

  • April 18, 2024

    Dems Propose Inspector General For High Court, Judiciary

    Democratic lawmakers introduced a bill Thursday that would create an inspector general's office for the judicial branch to investigate and report on allegations of misconduct lodged against U.S. Supreme Court justices, as well as judges throughout the federal judiciary.

  • April 18, 2024

    Ousted Clerk Was A 'Loose Cannon,' NC Justices Told

    An attorney who started proceedings that led to the ouster of former Franklin County Clerk of Court Patricia Chastain urged the North Carolina Supreme Court to keep her out of office, arguing that she undermined judicial authority through a series of incidents, including a "vulgar" accidental call to a magistrate judge.

  • April 18, 2024

    Feds Fight George Santos' 'Meritless' Brady Violation Claims

    Federal prosecutors are urging the Eastern District of New York to deny former U.S. Rep. George Santos' motion for a one-month delay in filing deadlines over allegations that the government withheld evidence in its fraud and campaign finance suit against him, calling the Long Island Republican's request "pretextual and meritless."

  • April 18, 2024

    9th Circ. Affirms Rosette's Win In Tribe Representation Fight

    The Ninth Circuit has backed a federal district court ruling that found Rosette LLP is not responsible for using allegedly false advertising to induce the Quechan Tribe to drop Williams & Cochrane LLP as counsel on the verge of closing a lucrative gambling contract.

  • April 18, 2024

    Atty Wants Law Firm Subpoenaed In $12M Somali Fraud Case

    A Maryland attorney accused of misappropriating more than $12 million in Somali state assets has asked a federal judge to subpoena his former firm, Shulman Rogers Gandal Pordy & Ecker PA, to produce his employment records.

  • April 18, 2024

    Ohio Ex-Atty Gets Prison For Bilking Real Estate Clients

    A former real estate attorney has been sentenced to four to six years of prison on charges he used his title company to steal from clients, the Ohio attorney general's office said Thursday.

  • April 18, 2024

    NJ Atty Fires Back At Litigation Funder's $18M Contract Claim

    A Florida-based litigation funder that is waging an $18 million breach of contract suit against a New Jersey lawyer has been hit with a countersuit alleging the business reneged on an agreement to secure funding for nationwide personal injury cases.

  • April 18, 2024

    7th Circ. Nom Heads To Senate Despite GOP Backlog Criticism

    The Senate Judiciary Committee advanced five judicial nominees Thursday, including U.S. District Judge Nancy L. Maldonado, a nominee for the Seventh Circuit, whom Republicans had questioned about a backlog of cases in her court.

  • April 18, 2024

    Conn. Ethics Office Wants Atty Suspended For Defying Audits

    The office that regulates Connecticut attorneys wants a lawyer with a decadelong history of failing to respond to grievances and information requests to be found in contempt and immediately suspended for failing to comply with a trust account audit.

  • April 18, 2024

    Ex-BigLaw Atty Can't Get Stalking Injunction Against Influencer

    A Florida state judge on Wednesday denied a former Greenberg Traurig LLP partner's request for a cyberstalking injunction against a social media influencer, saying the petitioner did not show enough evidence to justify it.

  • April 18, 2024

    Ex-NJ Lawyer Can't Erase Fraud Conviction, Feds Say

    Federal prosecutors told a New Jersey federal judge Wednesday the latest bid by ex-attorney Michael Kwasnik to undo his conviction and 18-year prison sentence for defrauding his clients of $13 million should meet the same fate as his previous efforts — dismissal.

  • April 18, 2024

    Jury Of 12 Picked For Trump Hush Money Case In NY

    A jury of 12 New Yorkers was selected Thursday for the hush money trial of former President Donald Trump on charges he falsified business records to keep news of an extramarital affair from damaging his 2016 electoral prospects.

  • April 18, 2024

    Sidney Powell Dodges Sanctions From Texas Bar

    Embattled Trump attorney Sidney Powell has dodged sanctions from the Texas state bar's disciplinary wing, with a state appellate court ruling Thursday that the Commission for Lawyer Discipline didn't bring enough solid arguments to the table to merit a redo of the case.

  • April 17, 2024

    Ethics Panel Douses Judge DQ Talk In 5th Circ. CFPB Case

    A judicial ethics panel has concluded that recusal isn't automatically required for the Fifth Circuit judge whose financial disclosures have fueled calls for his disqualification from litigation challenging the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's $8 credit card late fee rule.

  • April 17, 2024

    No Sanctions For Wordy Footnotes In Google Maps Case

    A California federal judge will not sanction attorneys representing Google Maps customers in an antitrust action for their "numerous and excessively long footnotes" after the lawyers on Wednesday explained it wasn't a tactic for avoiding page limits and promised not to do it again.

  • April 17, 2024

    'It Has To End': Justices Mull Finality In 32-Year Murder Saga

    In its second review of drug-fueled, baseball bat killings during the presidency of George H.W. Bush, the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday pondered steering an Arizona man's capital punishment challenge toward conclusion, perhaps by handling evidentiary tasks normally left to lower courts.

  • April 17, 2024

    UC Berkeley Law Dean Vouches For Dunn At Disciplinary Trial

    University of California, Berkeley School of Law Dean Erwin Chemerinsky testified as a character witness Wednesday in attorney Joseph Dunn's disciplinary trial, saying he holds the ousted California State Bar executive director in the highest regard, and his opinion is unlikely to change whatever the trial's outcome.

Expert Analysis

  • Surveying Legislative Trends As States Rush To Regulate AI

    Author Photo

    With Congress unlikely to pass comprehensive artificial intelligence legislation any time soon, just four months into 2024, nearly every state has introduced legislation aimed at the development and use of AI on subjects from algorithmic discrimination risk to generative AI disclosures, say David Kappos and Sasha Rosenthal-Larrea at Cravath.

  • How Duty Of Candor Figures In USPTO AI Ethics Guidance

    Author Photo

    The duty of candor and good faith is an important part of the artificial intelligence ethics guidance issued last week by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and serious consequences can visit patent and trademark applicants who violate that duty, not just their attorneys and agents, says Michael Cicero at Taylor English.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

    Author Photo

    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • Weisselberg's Perjury At Trial Spotlights Atty Ethics Issues

    Author Photo

    Former Trump Organization executive Allen Weisselberg’s recent guilty plea for perjury in the New York attorney general's civil fraud trial should serve as a reminder to attorneys of their ethical duties when they know a client has lied or plans to lie in court, and the potential penalties for not fulfilling those obligations, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

    Author Photo

    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Why Incorporating By Reference Is Rarely Good Practice

    Author Photo

    The Federal Circuit’s recent ruling in Promptu Systems v. Comcast serves as a reminder that while incorporating by reference may seem efficient, it is generally prohibited by courts and can lead to sanctions when used to bypass a word count limit, says Cullen Seltzer at Sands Anderson.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

    Author Photo

    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Trump's NY Civil Fraud Trial Spotlights Long-Criticized Law

    Author Photo

    A New York court’s recent decision holding former President Donald Trump liable for fraud brought old criticisms of the state law used against him back into the limelight — including its strikingly broad scope and its major departures from the traditional elements of common law fraud, say Mark Kelley and Lois Ahn at MoloLamken.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

    Author Photo

    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

    Author Photo

    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

    Author Photo

    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

    Author Photo

    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!