Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • May 28, 2024

    Fla. Health Co. Can't Nix Punitive Damages In Med Mal Suit

    A Florida appeals court won't strike a bid for punitive damages in a suit alleging an Orlando Health surgeon botched an appendectomy, saying there's sufficient evidence to justify the claim and that the hospital network is liable for the surgeon's hiring and retention.

  • May 24, 2024

    Uvalde Families Say Call Of Duty, Meta Groomed Shooter

    Families of schoolchildren shot at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, in 2022 alleged in a pair of lawsuits Friday that Meta Platforms' Instagram, the maker of first-person shooter video game Call of Duty, and a manufacturer of assault rifles helped inspire, train and equip the teenage gunman.

  • May 24, 2024

    GE Immune From Navy Member's Cancer Suit, 3rd Circ. Says

    The Third Circuit on Friday declined to revive a suit seeking to hold General Electric liable for failing to warn a deceased U.S. Navy veteran about asbestos risks at a government nuclear facility, ruling that derivative sovereign immunity bars the suit's claims.

  • May 24, 2024

    11th Circ. Lets Carnival Passenger Pursue Pain Damages

    The Eleventh Circuit on Friday granted a Carnival Cruise passenger's bid for a new trial seeking damages stemming from her falling out of a wheelchair while disembarking a ship, agreeing that the movant's previous jury award for medical expenses is inadequate without a nominal award for pain and suffering.

  • May 24, 2024

    No-Show Plaintiff, 'Jackass' Atty Booted Too Quickly, Court Says

    A Michigan appellate court sympathized with a trial court dealing with a no-show plaintiff and his lawyer who acted like a "jackass" — according to one appellate judge — but ruled Thursday that the trial court needed to do a better job documenting why it tossed the case instead of issuing a lesser sanction.

  • May 24, 2024

    Ohio Justices Say Regulator Must Take Freezing Death Case

    An Ohio trial court cannot hear a lawsuit seeking to hold Dominion Energy liable for a woman's freezing death after her natural gas was shut off, the state Supreme Court ruled Friday, reasoning the matter belongs before the state's utilities regulator because the shutoff was an act authorized by the utility.

  • May 24, 2024

    Fla. Jury Finds Ayahuasca Church Liable For Attendee's Death

    A Florida state court jury has found that an ayahuasca church is liable for the death of a man who used psychedelic drugs at a weekend retreat in 2018, and has determined that the organization and its owner should pay more than $15 million to the man's parents.

  • May 24, 2024

    'Vanderpump Rules' Star Can't Cancel 'Scandoval' Claims

    A California judge ruled Friday that "Vanderpump Rules" star Tom Sandoval cannot escape all claims in a suit by former co-star Rachel Leviss alleging he secretly recorded sexually explicit videos she sent him, leading to the show's "Scandoval" cheating scandal, dismissing one claim but allowing Leviss to amend the complaint.

  • May 24, 2024

    Mich. Trampoline Park Defeats Jumper's Quadriplegia Suit

    Michigan appellate judges have reversed a lower court's refusal to end a negligence suit by a patron who became quadriplegic after landing on his neck at an indoor trampoline park while performing a flip, finding no dispute the patron was at least half responsible since he was intoxicated. 

  • May 24, 2024

    Alec Baldwin Must Face 'Rust' Shooting Charges

    A New Mexico state judge on Friday denied Alec Baldwin's motion to dismiss his indictment on involuntary manslaughter charges in the fatal on-set shooting of a cinematographer during the filming of "Rust" in Santa Fe, rejecting the actor's claims of prosecutorial misconduct before the grand jury.

  • May 24, 2024

    Biden's Judicial Impact And What's Left On The Wish List

    President Joe Biden secured confirmation of his 200th federal judge Wednesday and has transformed the judiciary by picking more women and people of color than any other president. But the upcoming election season could derail his hopes of confirming many more judges.

  • May 24, 2024

    3rd Circ. Backs US Immunity Over Marine Recruit's Death

    The Third Circuit has said that "tragedy does not trump sovereign immunity" in a precedential ruling finding that the federal government is immune from a wrongful death suit brought by a U.S. Marine Corps recruit's family after he crashed his car and died on the way to an event for the corps.

  • May 24, 2024

    Weinstein Atty Trying To Chill Retrial Testimony, DA Says

    The Manhattan District Attorney's Office has argued that a lawyer for Harvey Weinstein violated ethics rules by publicly accusing one of the movie mogul's alleged rape victims of perjury in an "obvious" attempt to dissuade her from testifying again at an upcoming retrial.

  • May 24, 2024

    No Private Suits Under State Enviro Law, Ill. Justices Say

    The daughter of a woman badly burned in a condominium complex explosion cannot bring bodily injury claims against Marathon Petroleum Co. and others under Illinois' environmental protection laws because they do not provide private statutory rights of action, the Illinois Supreme Court has ruled.

  • May 24, 2024

    Insurer's Coverage Suit Premature, Ga. Apt. Complex Says

    An apartment complex facing negligence claims over a shooting told a Georgia federal court that its insurer's suit seeking to avoid coverage must be tossed, arguing that without any factual findings in the underlying state court action, any finding on the insurer's duty to indemnify would be premature.

  • May 24, 2024

    Stew Leonard's Sued Over Dancer's Peanut Allergy Death

    The family of a U.K.-born dancer is suing the Stew Leonard's grocery store chain, alleging its failure to update labels of cookies that contained peanuts led to her death at age 25 from an allergic reaction.

  • May 23, 2024

    TikTok, YouTube Must Produce European Privacy Data In MDL

    A California federal magistrate judge overseeing discovery in multidistrict litigation over whether social media platforms' design is addictive ordered TikTok and YouTube on Thursday to give American personal injury plaintiffs certain technical documents regarding the companies' safety features implemented in Europe and Australia, which have tougher consumer privacy laws.

  • May 23, 2024

    RFK Jr.'s Anti-Vax Suit Against Wash. AG Tossed

    A Washington federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought by Robert F. Kennedy Jr. on behalf of NBA legend John Stockton trying to shield doctors who make anti-vaccine statements, ruling claims that a medical board probe has chilled speech are speculative.

  • May 23, 2024

    Astroworld Death Claims Close As 9-Year-Old's Family Settles

    The family of the youngest Astroworld victim have settled their case, an attorney for the family said Thursday, bringing the end of all wrongful death litigation stemming from the crowd crush at the 2021 music festival.

  • May 23, 2024

    Man Can't Enforce Fatal Car Crash Settlement, Ga. Panel Says

    The Georgia Court of Appeals on Thursday affirmed a trial court's rejection of a motion to enforce a presuit settlement in a case accusing a driver of fatally striking a man who was standing next to his vehicle on a highway's emergency lane, finding no agreement ever formed.

  • May 23, 2024

    Bell, Boeing Face Suit Over Marines Killed In Osprey Crash

    The families of four of the five marines killed in the June 2022 crash of an Osprey V-22 aircraft sued Bell Textron Inc., The Boeing Co. and Rolls-Royce Corp. Thursday in California federal court, alleging defects in the aircraft led to the fatal crash.

  • May 23, 2024

    Kratom Cos. Failed To Warn Man About Risks, Colo. Suit Says

    The parents of a deceased Colorado man allege that four companies that sell kratom are liable for their son's death because of their failure to warn consumers about the risks associated with using the loosely regulated plant-derived substance with opioid-like effects.

  • May 23, 2024

    Ex-Physical Therapy Clinics Owner Gets 2 Yrs. In Billing Scam

    The former owner of eight physical therapy clinics in the Boston area was sentenced Thursday in Massachusetts federal court to just over two years in prison for a years-long scheme to bill insurance companies for nonexistent treatments, including for himself.

  • May 23, 2024

    Lockheed Urges 11th Circ. To Affirm Win In Solvent Suit

    Lockheed Martin Corp. asked the Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday to uphold a Florida district court's rejection of a proposed expert's testimony purporting to link a now-deceased former employee's multiple sclerosis to her work-related exposure to industrial solvents.

  • May 23, 2024

    Length A 'Red Herring' In Black Student's Hair Bias Case

    A Black Texas high school student claiming his Houston-area district is discriminating against him for wearing his hair in locs told a Galveston judge Thursday the district forces students to choose a religion if they want to style their hair outside the district's dress code, as he fought off multiple dismissal bids.

Expert Analysis

  • A Vision For Economic Clerkships In The Legal System

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    As courts handle increasingly complex damages analyses involving vast amounts of data, an economic clerkship program — integrating early-career economists into the judicial system — could improve legal outcomes and provide essential training to clerks, say Mona Birjandi at Data for Decisions and Matt Farber at Secretariat.

  • When The Platform Is A Product, Strict Liability Can Attach

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    A New York state court's recent ruling in Patterson v. Meta, holding that social media platforms can be considered products, appears to be the first of its kind — but if it is upheld and adopted by other courts, the liability implications for internet companies could be incredibly far-reaching, say attorneys at Patterson Belknap.

  • E-Discovery Quarterly: Recent Rulings On Text Message Data

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    Electronically stored information on cellphones, and in particular text messages, can present unique litigation challenges, and recent court decisions demonstrate that counsel must carefully balance what data should be preserved, collected, reviewed and produced, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Keeping Up With Class Actions: A New Era Of Higher Stakes

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    Corporate defendants saw unprecedented settlement numbers across all areas of class action litigation in 2022 and 2023, and this year has kept pace so far, with three settlements that stand out for the nature of the claims and for their high dollar amounts, says Gerald Maatman at Duane Morris.

  • Is The Digital Accessibility Storm Almost Over?

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    Though private businesses have faced a decadelong deluge of digital accessibility complaints in the absence of clear regulations or uniformity among the courts, attorneys at Epstein Becker address how recent federal courts’ pushback against serial Americans with Disabilities Act plaintiffs and the U.S. Department of Justice’s proposed government accessibility standards may presage a break in the downpour.

  • Series

    Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • Ill. Justices' Ruling Answers Corporate Defamation Questions

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent unanimous decision in Project44 v. FourKites provides needed certainty and direction for lower courts considering defamation cases involving communications to corporate officers from third parties outside the corporation, which could result in fewer unwarranted motions to dismiss in trial courts and nonmeritorious appeals, says Phillip Zisook at Schoenberg Finkel.

  • Don't Use The Same Template For Every Client Alert

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    As the old marketing adage goes, consistency is key, but law firm style guides need consistency that contemplates variety when it comes to client alert formats, allowing attorneys to tailor alerts to best fit the audience and subject matter, says Jessica Kaplan at Legally Penned.

  • Series

    Walking With My Dog Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Thanks to my dog Birdie, I've learned that carving out an activity different from the practice of law — like daily outdoor walks that allow you to interact with new people — can contribute to professional success by boosting creativity and mental acuity, as well as expanding your social network, says Sarah Petrie at the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office.

  • Could 'General Average' Apply To The Key Bridge Crash?

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    While the owner and operator of the vessel that struck Baltimore's Francis Scott Key Bridge have sought legal protection under the Limitation of Liability Act, they could choose to invoke the long-standing principle of general average, if supported by the facts of the crash and the terms of their contracts with cargo owners, says Julie Maurer at Husch Blackwell.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Follow The Iron Rule Of Trial Logic

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    Many diligent and eager attorneys include every good fact, point and rule in their trial narratives — spurred by the gnawing fear they’ll be second-guessed for leaving something out — but this approach ignores a fundamental principle of successful trial lawyering, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • The Art Of Asking: Leveraging Your Contacts For Referrals

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    Though attorneys may hesitate to ask for referral recommendations to generate new business, research shows that people want to help others they know, like and trust, so consider who in your network you should approach and how to make the ask, says Rebecca Hnatowski at Edwards Advisory.

  • Series

    Being An Equestrian Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Beyond getting experience thinking on my feet and tackling stressful situations, the skills I've gained from horseback riding have considerable overlap with the skills used to practice law, particularly in terms of team building, continuing education, and making an effort to reset and recharge, says Kerry Irwin at Moore & Van Allen.

  • Teach Your Party Representative The Art Of Nonverbal Cues

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    As illustrated by recent reports about President Donald Trump’s nonverbal communication in court, jurors notice what’s happening at counsel table, which may color their perceptions of the case as a whole, so trial attorneys should teach party representatives to self-monitor their nonverbal behaviors, says Clint Townson at Townson Consulting.

  • Considering CGL Defense For Social Media Addiction Claims

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    A recent lawsuit filed in California state court against Meta seeks damages from technology companies for the costs of treating children allegedly suffering from social media addiction, but the prospects of defense coverage under commercial general liability insurance policies for a potential new wave of claims look promising, say Craig Hirsch and Tae Andrews at Pasich.

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