Transportation

  • May 06, 2024

    Judge Backs H-2B Visa Rejection For Missing Trucking Routes

    A U.S. Department of Labor official was not wrong to reject a trucking company's application to hire foreign long-haul truckers because the company failed to provide detailed routes for the drivers, an agency judge said.

  • May 06, 2024

    EPA Finalizes Methane Reporting Regs For Oil And Gas Cos.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday finalized revisions of its Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program regulations for the oil and gas sector, the latest step taken by the Biden administration to clamp down on methane emissions from the industry.

  • May 06, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A record $100 million settlement, a fishy Facebook decision, a canceled Amazon delivery and an upended $7.3 billion sale dispute topped the news out of Delaware's Court of Chancery last week. There were also new cases involving Hess, Microsoft and the 2022 World Cup.

  • May 06, 2024

    Auto Parts Co. Strikes Deal To End Suit Over $1.6B 401(k) Plan

    Auto parts supplier Magna International agreed to settle a class action covering about 20,000 workers who claimed to have lost millions in retirement savings because the company failed to cut underperforming and costly investments from their $1.6 billion retirement plan.

  • May 03, 2024

    Gilstrap Scraps $6.6M Tire Pressure IP Verdict Against Autel

    A federal judge in Texas has granted Autel's post-trial motion for judgment as a matter of law that it does not infringe an Orange Electronic Co. Ltd. tire pressure monitoring patent, wiping out a $6.6 million jury verdict from June.

  • May 03, 2024

    Panama Builder Seeks TRO In Del. After Port Case Remand

    Victims of an alleged "brazen and intricate" international scheme to steal an entire $1.4 billion Panama Canal port project by way of sham Delaware companies and claims urged a Delaware vice chancellor on Friday to convene a temporary restraining order hearing next week to sidetrack the effort.

  • May 03, 2024

    Mich. Justices Punt On Privacy Questions In Drone Dispute

    The Michigan Supreme Court on Friday dodged a novel question about the constitutionality of a town's drone surveillance of a couple's property, ruling that photos taken by the drone could not be suppressed in a zoning proceeding.

  • May 03, 2024

    Nikola Ends Board Takeover Suit As Ex-CEO's Noms Withdraw

    An Arizona federal judge on Thursday agreed to toss Nikola Corp.'s complaint against its former CEO and convicted felon Trevor Milton and several others accusing them of an illegal board takeover by pushing unqualified candidates, after the defendants withdrew their board nominees and the parties amicably resolved the dispute.

  • May 03, 2024

    Ex-Spirit Flight Attendant Drops FMLA Suit

    A Florida federal judge on Friday dismissed a lawsuit a former flight attendant lodged against Spirit Airlines accusing it of firing her after she complained that its medical leave policies ran afoul of the Family and Medical Leave Act.

  • May 03, 2024

    Honolulu Asks Justices To Affirm State Court Climate Case

    Honolulu on Wednesday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reject fossil fuel companies' bid to put an end to its lawsuit alleging they knew for decades about the negative impacts of their products on climate change but concealed the information.

  • May 03, 2024

    DC Circ. Backs Feds' Puerto Rico Port Expansion Project

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday upheld the federal government's plans to broaden shipping lanes at Puerto Rico's largest port, rejecting arguments from a trio of environmental groups who accused the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers of failing to take the requisite hard look at the dredging project's environmental risks.

  • May 03, 2024

    Arbitration Exemption Doesn't Cover Cos., Conn. Judge Rules

    Two food distributors who created corporate entities while working for a food service business must arbitrate claims they were misclassified as independent contractors because a Federal Arbitration Act carveout doesn't apply to businesses, a Connecticut federal judge has ruled.

  • May 03, 2024

    Sens. Look To Add Kids Online Bills To FAA Bill

    A bipartisan group of senators is looking to add legislation to better protect kids online and on social media to the Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization Act, which faces a May 10 deadline for enactment.

  • May 03, 2024

    Robbins Geller Attys To Take Stand In $8M Sanctions Dispute

    A petroleum refiner will put current and former Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP attorneys on the stand May 7 in an extraordinary evidentiary hearing testing what the plaintiffs' lawyers knew about an analyst's now-discredited findings as they pursued since-nixed price-fixing claims.

  • May 03, 2024

    Ohio Atty Gets 3rd Suspension After Not Reporting Conviction

    A Cleveland-area attorney trying to get reinstated after neglecting bankruptcy cases was suspended yet again by the Ohio Supreme Court, which said he failed to report a drug conviction to his county bar association for almost eight months.

  • May 03, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen rapper Ivorian Doll hit with a copyright claim, private members club Aspinalls file a claim against a Saudi sheikh, and Motorola Solutions file a claim against the British government on the heels of its dispute over losing a £400 million ($502 million) government contract. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 03, 2024

    Car Loan Co. Strikes Deal In Employee Stock Valuation Suit

    A car loan company has agreed to resolve a proposed class action alleging it violated federal benefits law when it revalued its stock at the start of the pandemic and forced retirees to sell their shares at a lower value, according to a California federal court filing.

  • May 03, 2024

    Final EV Tax Credit Regs Add New Battery Tracing Test

    The U.S. Treasury Department unveiled final regulations Friday for the up to $7,500 electric vehicle tax credit that include a more detailed process for automakers to trace the battery supply chain to qualify for the credit's domestic content requirements.

  • May 02, 2024

    Boeing Supplier Sues Texas AG To Block Safety Investigation

    The subsidiary of a company that produces fuselages for Boeing's 737 jets sued on Wednesday to block the Texas attorney general's investigation into apparent manufacturing issues that have caused recent midair emergencies, saying the probe is unconstitutional and violates the company's right to be free from unreasonable searches.

  • May 02, 2024

    Hahn Air To Pay Feds $26.8M To End FCA Travel Fees Suit

    Hahn Air Lines agreed to pay $26.8 million to resolve a whistleblower's allegations that the German airline-ticketing company violated the False Claims Act by intentionally failing to remit to the U.S. government certain travel fees the company collected from U.S. commercial airline passengers.

  • May 02, 2024

    Latham, Skadden Grab Spotlight As Large IPOs Surge In April

    Latham & Watkins LLP guided five initial public offerings in April, while Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP advised the company bringing to market the largest IPO of 2024, concluding the busiest month for new listings year to date.

  • May 02, 2024

    Ship Captain Gets 4 Years Over Boat Fire That Killed 34

    A California federal judge on Thursday sentenced a ship captain to four years in prison over his conviction stemming from a deadly boat fire that killed 34 people, citing the captain's remorse and lack of ill intent as he declined to impose the government's and some victims' family members' request for the statutory maximum of 10 years.

  • May 02, 2024

    Chancery Ruling Plays Role In Tesla's S&P Governance Grade

    Business rating agency Standard & Poor's has revised downward to "moderately negative" electric vehicle company Tesla Inc.'s grade for management and governance, pointing in part to CEO Elon Musk's dominant role, and the company's "uncommonly high" risk from lawsuits, including the Delaware Chancery Court's recent scuttling of his $56 billion pay plan.

  • May 02, 2024

    NYC Wants To Bill For 'Weaponized Transport' Of Migrants

    A lawyer for New York City told a state court judge Thursday that Texas bus companies should cover the costs of caring for migrants transported there amid litigation over Gov. Greg Abbott's "budget-breaking scheme" to influence immigration policy.

  • May 02, 2024

    6th Circ. Appears Reluctant To Kick 401(k) Suit To Arbitration

    A Sixth Circuit panel seemed likely Thursday to deny two auto part companies' bid to compel arbitration of a lawsuit from workers who say their retirement savings were mismanaged, though the judges appeared divided on the broader question of whether retirement plans may force planwide claims into individual arbitration.

Expert Analysis

  • Del. Segway Dismissal Suggests Execs Not Liable For Biz Risk

    Author Photo

    While the debate continues within the Delaware Chancery Court over whether Caremark liability applies to matters of pure business risk, the court's recent rejection of Segway’s suit against the ex-president who oversaw financial difficulties suggests the court is uninterested in undermining the deference the business judgment rule grants corporate fiduciaries, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Aviation Watch: 737 Max Blowout Raises Major Safety Issues

    Author Photo

    The sudden in-flight loss of a side panel on an Alaska Air 737-9 Max last month, leaving a gaping hole in the side of the plane's cabin, highlighted ongoing quality issues at Boeing, the jet's manufacturer — but the failure also arose from decisions made by the airline, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Opinion

    New La. Gas Pipeline Projects Must Respect Rules And Rights

    Author Photo

    As pipeline developers rush to join in Louisiana's Haynesville Shale gas boom, established operators like Energy Transfer are justified in demanding that newer entrants respect safety rules, regulatory requirements and property rights when proposing routes that would cross existing pipelines, says Joshua Campbell at Campbell Law.

  • Freight Forwarders And Common Carriers: Know Your Cargo

    Author Photo

    Freight forwarders and other nonprincipal parties involved in global cargo movement should follow the guidance in the multi-agency know-your-cargo compliance note to avoid enforcement actions should they fail to spot evasive tactics used in supply chains to circumvent U.S. sanctions and export controls, say attorneys at Venable.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

    Author Photo

    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • The Latest Antitrust Areas For In-House Counsel To Watch

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission's increasingly aggressive approach to antitrust enforcement means in-house counsel should closely monitor five key compliance issues, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • Del.'s Tesla Pay Takedown Tells Boards What Not To Do

    Author Photo

    The Delaware Chancery Court’s ruthless dissection of the Tesla board’s extreme departures from standard corporate governance in its January opinion striking down CEO Elon Musk’s $55 billion pay package offers a blow-by-blow guide to mistakes Delaware public companies can avoid when negotiating executive compensation, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Aviation Back On Course, But Keep Seat Belts Fastened

    Author Photo

    While the airline industry finally returned to profitability last year for the first time since the onset of COVID-19, and is poised for historic levels of traffic in 2024, supply chain problems and economic and geopolitical uncertainty persist — so more turbulence may lie ahead, say Kevin Lewis and Bart Biggers at Sidley.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Standing And A Golden Rule

    Author Photo

    In this month's bid protest roundup, Victoria Angle at MoFo examines one recent decision that clarifies the elements necessary to establish prejudice and federal claims court standing in multiphase protests, and two that exemplify a government procurements golden rule.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

    Author Photo

    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Brazil

    Author Photo

    Environmental, social and governance issues have increasingly translated into new legislation in Brazil since 2020, and in the wake of these recently enacted regulations, we are likely to see a growing number of legal disputes in the largest South American country related to ESG issues such as greenwashing if companies are not prepared to adequately adapt and comply, say attorneys at Mattos Filho.

  • Opinion

    Gilead Ruling Signals That Innovating Can Lead To Liability

    Author Photo

    A California appeals court's ruling last month in Gilead Life Sciences v. Superior Court of San Francisco that a drug manufacturer can be held liable for delaying the introduction of an improved version of its medication raises concerns about the chilling effects that expansive product liability claims may have on innovation, says Gary Myers at the University of Missouri School of Law.

  • Vagueness In Calif. Climate Law Makes Compliance Tricky

    Author Photo

    California's recently enacted Voluntary Carbon Market Disclosures Act requires companies making claims of carbon neutrality, or significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions, to disclose information supporting those claims — but vague and conflicting language in the statute poses multiple problems for businesses, say John Rousakis and Chris Bowman at O'Melveny.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Transportation archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!