Washington

  • April 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A multibillion-dollar Tesla trust proposal, a Truth Social bond, power plays over Prince's estate, and three in the ring for World Wrestling Entertainment. All of this and much more came up in Delaware Chancery Court dockets last week.

  • April 29, 2024

    9th Circ. Urged To Revive Nazi-Looted Art Claim

    A California man who has been trying for nearly two decades to get a Spanish museum to return a painting that the Nazis stole from his great-grandmother is urging the Ninth Circuit to rethink a unanimous panel decision concluding that the museum is under no obligation to do so.

  • April 29, 2024

    Wash. Solar Co. Will Pay $465K To End Noncompete Suit

    A Washington state judge has given a preliminary nod to a $465,000 settlement to end litigation accusing a residential solar energy equipment company of forcing workers to sign illegal noncompete clauses as a condition of employment.

  • April 26, 2024

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    In the past year, plaintiffs have won settlements and judgments for millions and billions of dollars from companies such as Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, Facebook and Fox News, with many high-profile cases finally wrapping up after years of fighting. Such cases — involving over-the-top compensation packages, chemical contamination, gender discrimination and data mining — were led by attorneys whose accomplishments earned them recognition as Law360's Titans of the Plaintiffs Bar for 2024.

  • April 26, 2024

    Wash. Judge To Resign, Denies Domestic Abuse Allegations

    A Washington state superior court judge announced he will resign next month after the state judicial conduct commission accused him last fall of domestic abuse against his ex-wife and a court clerk, saying the commission has pressured him to admit to wrongdoing that never happened.

  • April 26, 2024

    Albright Sinks Microsoft's Transfer Bid In Proxense Fight

    U.S. District Judge Alan Albright rejected efforts by Microsoft to send an infringement lawsuit over its cloud software to its home in Washington state, citing on Friday his own "experience and effort" dealing with patents covering "a pint-sized virtual wallet" in other suits.

  • April 26, 2024

    Wash. Judge Doubts He Can Block Kroger Merger

    A Washington state judge expressed "serious doubts" Friday he could block the $24.6 billion Kroger and Albertsons merger but declined to dismiss the state attorney general's lawsuit seeking to derail the deal, saying that the state still had more narrowly tailored remedies to address its anti-competition concerns.

  • April 26, 2024

    Support For 9th Circ. Rehearing In Oak Flat Dispute Mounting

    At least 100 religious and nonprofit groups, law scholars, Native American coalitions and tribes are urging the Ninth Circuit to consider a full panel en banc hearing on a challenge to block a copper mining company from destroying a sacred Indigenous religious site in central Arizona.

  • April 26, 2024

    Thomas' Long Quest To Undo A 'Grave Constitutional Error'

    A quarter-century after Justice Clarence Thomas cast a pivotal vote against jury trial rights and rapidly regretted it, his relentless campaign to undo the controversial precedent is suddenly center stage with a serious shot at succeeding, as judges and lawyers increasingly deem the decision dubious and the U.S. Supreme Court chips away at its edges.

  • April 26, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Block Calif.'s Universal Service Funding Rule

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday rejected a push to block California's new contribution regime for its statewide universal service fund, with the appellate judges ruling that the challenge from T-Mobile and its subsidiaries was unlikely to succeed on the merits.

  • April 26, 2024

    Alaska Airlines Rogue Pilot Suit Not Grounded Yet

    A Washington state court judge ruled Friday that Alaska Airlines passengers' state negligence claims were entirely preempted by federal regulations, but gave them a chance to revise their suit to claim the airline violated federal safety rules by allowing an off-duty pilot into the cockpit who allegedly tried to sabotage the flight.

  • April 26, 2024

    No Coverage For Treasure Hunter's IP Row, 9th Circ. Rules

    Great American Insurance Co. had no coverage obligations over a $7.5 million settlement stemming from a treasure hunter's claims that his former partners refused to hand over maps and other intellectual property after they parted ways, the Ninth Circuit ruled Friday, finding the treasure hunter didn't allege insurable, accidental conduct.

  • April 26, 2024

    Co. Says Policy Fight On $45B DOE Deal Isn't For Claims Court

    A joint venture awarded a $45 billion nuclear waste management contract is urging the Court of Federal Claims to reject a rival's allegation that a U.S. Department of Energy policy change enabling the contract award was improper, saying the claims court lacked jurisdiction.

  • April 26, 2024

    Staffing Agency Escapes Applicant's Salary Disclosure Suit

    A Washington federal judge threw out a proposed class action a job applicant brought against a staffing agency under the Evergreen State's 2023 law requiring certain employers to disclose a salary range in job postings, saying a plaintiff has to actually want the job they are suing over.

  • April 26, 2024

    9th Circ. Sends Warner Bros. False Ad Suit To Arbitration

    Warner Bros. can arbitrate a proposed false advertising class action over its Game of Thrones: Conquest mobile app game, the Ninth Circuit said Friday, finding the customers had "reasonably conspicuous notice" of the app's terms of service that contained an arbitration provision via a sign-in wrap agreement.

  • April 26, 2024

    FTC Claims Amazon Execs Destroyed Antitrust Evidence

    The Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general urged a Washington federal judge to force Amazon to produce documents detailing its preservation efforts in their high-stakes antitrust fight, arguing that discovery has revealed that ex-CEO Jeff Bezos and other executives used the encrypted app Signal to destroy relevant antitrust evidence.

  • April 26, 2024

    Parking Co. Strikes $1.4M Deal To End Pay Transparency Suit

    A parking lot company has agreed to pay a class of almost 300 job seekers $1.4 million to shutter a suit claiming it shirked a Washington pay transparency law requiring that all job postings include salary and benefit information, according to state court filings.

  • April 25, 2024

    9th Circ. Upholds $1.7M Injury Verdict Against Genie

    Equipment manufacturer Genie Industries Inc. can't upend a jury verdict and a $1.7 million judgment awarded to a Portland, Oregon, shipyard worker who was injured by the company's allegedly defective lift boom, the Ninth Circuit has ruled, rejecting the arguments that he failed to prove his injuries were permanent.

  • April 25, 2024

    FTC Sues Bill-Payment Co. Over Misleading Ads, Junk Fees

    The Federal Trade Commission on Thursday filed suit against a Seattle-based, third-party bill-paying company for allegedly tricking online consumers into using the company's service by disguising itself as consumers' billers' official payment channel and tacking on junk fees.

  • April 25, 2024

    Atty Sued For Malpractice Can't Rep His Firm, Ex-Client Says

    A Seattle real estate broker suing her former attorney for allegedly botching arbitration proceedings has told a Washington state judge that that attorney can't both be a defendant and represent his firm in their counterclaims for unpaid fees. 

  • April 25, 2024

    FCC OKs $1.35B T-Mobile, Mint Deal With Unlocked Phones

    The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday approved T-Mobile's $1.35 billion purchase of Ka'ena, the parent company of Hollywood actor Ryan Reynolds' wireless brand Mint Mobile, adopting as a condition for approval the carrier's commitment to more quickly "unlocking" its phones so they can be transferred between service providers.

  • April 25, 2024

    Microsoft, Nintendo And Others Sued Over Addictive Games

    A gamer sued Microsoft Corp., Nintendo of America Inc., Rockstar Games Inc. and other video game developers Wednesday in Georgia federal court over allegations that they are intentionally getting users addicted to boost profits, saying he's suffering from depression and anxiety because of his addiction.

  • April 25, 2024

    Wash. Large-Magazine Ban Stays As Court Official Fears Tragedy

    The Washington Supreme Court commissioner said Thursday the state can maintain its ban on the sale of large-capacity magazines for now, saying in his ruling he was kept awake at night over the potential that lifting the ban would allow an especially "awful" mass shooting.

  • April 25, 2024

    Wash. Appeals Court Rejects Seattle High-Rise Permit Dispute

    A Washington state appeals court sided with a developer on Thursday in a challenge to its plan for a 17-story apartment building on Seattle's waterfront, concluding that the project's opponents missed their chance to contest the city's decision not to hold the proposal to certain shoreline regulations.

  • April 25, 2024

    T-Mobile, EQT Form Joint Venture To Acquire Fiber Biz

    T-Mobile and private equity shop EQT on Thursday announced that they have entered into a joint venture, under which T-Mobile will invest $950 million at closing, to purchase fiber-to-the-home platform Lumos from one of EQT's previous infrastructure funds, in a deal built by at least three firms.

Expert Analysis

  • After Headwinds, 2024 May See Offshore Wind Momentum

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    Despite skyrocketing raw material costs, conflicting state and federal policies, and other setbacks for the offshore wind sector in 2023, the industry appears poised for growth in the coming year, with improving economics, more flexible procurement procedures and increasing legislative support, say Emily Huggins Jones and Ben Cowan at Locke Lord.

  • 5 Trends That Will Affect Food Litigation In 2024

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    In 2024, food and beverage companies are likely to continue to face threats of litigation relating to so-called forever chemicals, citric and malic acid, and ESG claims, but recent developments in case law have created potential avenues for defense, say Abby Meyer and Khirin Bunker at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Law Firm Strategies For Successfully Navigating 2024 Trends

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    Though law firms face the dual challenge of external and internal pressures as they enter 2024, firms willing to pivot will be able to stand out by adapting to stakeholder needs and reimagining their infrastructure, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Consultants.

  • 10 Privacy Compliance Areas To Focus On In 2024

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    The fast pace of change in the cybersecurity realm means reactive approaches to new laws, regulations and enforcement actions are not effective ways to build or scale privacy programs, so companies should plan strategically and prepare for a few emerging risks and requirements in the first half of this year, says Sam Castic at Hintze Law.

  • The Most-Read Legal Industry Law360 Guest Articles Of 2023

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    A range of legal industry topics drew readers' attention in Law360's Expert Analysis section this year, from associate retention strategies to ethical billing practices.

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • 9th Circ. Scienter Ruling May Strengthen FDA's Leverage

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    A recent Ninth Circuit decision in U.S. v. Marschall — regarding scienter and violations of the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act — appears to give the U.S. Food and Drug Administration another arrow in its quiver to lob in the direction of any repeat offender, with potentially very broad applications, say Elena Quattrone and Zachary Taylor at Epstein Becker.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • The Key Laws Retailers Should Pay Attention To In 2024

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    2024 promises to be another transformative year for retailers as they navigate the evolving regulatory landscape, particularly surrounding data privacy and sustainability laws, meaning companies should make it a practice to keep track of new legislation and invest in compliance efforts early on, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • What's Ahead For Immigrant Employee Rights Enforcement

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s increased enforcement related to immigration-based employment discrimination is coupled with pending constitutional challenges to administrative tribunals, suggesting employers should leverage those headwinds when facing investigations or class action-style litigation, say attorneys at Jones Day.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Still Murky After A Choppy 2023

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    This year brought several important Clean Water Act jurisdictional developments, including multiple agency rules and a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that substantially altered the definition of "waters of the United States," but a new wave of litigation challenges has already begun, with no clear end in sight, say attorneys at Nossaman.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • FDA's Recent Litigation Records Are Strong, But Imperfect

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    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notched its share of litigation wins in recent years thanks to a number of key advantages, but the FDA has been less successful in certain highly visible arenas, Jonathan Berman and Colleen Heisey at Jones Day.

  • Starbucks Raise Ruling Highlights Labor Law Catch-22

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge recently ruled that Starbucks violated federal labor law when it gave raises to nonunion employees only, demonstrating that conflicts present in workforces with both union and nonunion employees can put employers in no-win situations if they don't consider how their actions will be interpreted, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

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